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I keep reading conflicting descriptions. I even called the dealership. Was told PROBABLY awd. Probably isn’t a definite in my book. Anyone else wondering, or maybe knows for sure?
🤞🏻 4x4
 

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I keep reading conflicting descriptions. I even called the dealership. Was told PROBABLY awd. Probably isn’t a definite in my book. Anyone else wondering, or maybe knows for sure?
🤞🏻 4x4
It depends on your definition. It has two independent motors, one on each axle. Independent front and rear suspension. Computer controls power delivery to the wheels.
 

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4x4 typically refers to a "low range" being offered via a gear box. Most stock 4x4's will be stuck if a front and rear wheel looses traction, same with most AWD cars. More and more though manufacturers are having some sort of "traction control" to keep this from happening. The advantage of a "low range" is the tourqe that comes with it, as it doesn't add more traction.

In this setup there is no need for this, as torque is there from the get go.

A better question would be "does it have lockers" or comparable tech? The Rivian uses 4 electric motors, one per wheel, and keeps it "locked" at all four wheels and is a beast.

I believe Consumer reports did a extensive snow test on three AWD and one Rear Wheel drive vehicle and the Subaru kept winning over and over (it was a test over tires more than cars though). They did find that tires made a huge difference in snow (no surprise).

I've not read anything specific on the lightning yet, but, given its very quick accel times they no doubt have some sort of traction control.

My own person experience is that I owned a "rubicon" jeep when I moved to this home. I had a smallish hill it would not go up, in low range, with all axles "locked" and hitting it with speed. This was with some really nice mud tires also. I built a 1948 Jeep Willy's truck that was mostly stock with toyota axles and it would scream up it and nothing on it was "locked". Just a little added wheel base did the trick. Both are sold now. Now my T100 would struggle to go up the gravel path in 2wd (thankfully its 4wd) but my Nissan Leaf (has traction control) will go up it (still slips some). But if I have a load of gravel in the back of the T100 (had it yesterday) it'll go up just fine in 2wd.

I suspect the lightning will do realy well given its low center of gravity, should have a nice weight distribution (a problem on RWD trucks), instant torque and what I suspect will be decent traction control.
 

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Watching Doug DeMuro’s extensive walkthrough of the Lightning
At 22 minutes in he reveals the touchscreen has access to electronic differential locking. So it sounds like the Lightning will have something resembling a true 4WD rather than just AWD like the Mach E.
 

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I keep reading conflicting descriptions. I even called the dealership. Was told PROBABLY awd. Probably isn’t a definite in my book. Anyone else wondering, or maybe knows for sure?
🤞🏻 4x4
These terms are actually becoming obsolete with these electric drive units.

Historically, "4x4" was used to refer to systems that would mechanically lock torque bias equally front and rear, while "AWD" was used in vehicles capable of moving only a portion of available torque from one axle to the next; usually through a clutch system.

The Lighting, as with the Tesla that I drive now, is capable of providing 100% torque to all four wheels at once, operationally putting in in the same category as a 4x4 with fully locked differentials.

Since the Lightning (and the model Y) have a "mode" that equalizes torque front to rear, they are "4x4s". It could be argued that since the tesla model 3 has no such "mode" (yet), it is the new definition of "AWD". This said, the lines between the two have become significantly blurred with advancing technology. A better question becomes, "does the vehicle have an Off-road mode that provides for instant torque to all the wheels?... which is all you can ask from the very best 4x4s.

In the case of the Lightning, the answer is yes.
 

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These terms are actually becoming obsolete with these electric drive units.

Historically, "4x4" was used to refer to systems that would mechanically lock torque bias equally front and rear, while "AWD" was used in vehicles capable of moving only a portion of available torque from one axle to the next; usually through a clutch system.

The Lighting, as with the Tesla that I drive now, is capable of providing 100% torque to all four wheels at once, operationally putting in in the same category as a 4x4 with fully locked differentials.

Since the Lightning (and the model Y) have a "mode" that equalizes torque front to rear, they are "4x4s". It could be argued that since the tesla model 3 has no such "mode" (yet), it is the new definition of "AWD". This said, the lines between the two have become significantly blurred with advancing technology. A better question becomes, "does the vehicle have an Off-road mode that provides for instant torque to all the wheels?... which is all you can ask from the very best 4x4s.

In the case of the Lightning, the answer is yes.
Since there is no front locker listed, I’m assuming the front differential is open. With the rear locker engaged the Lightning can drive 3 of the tires. Traction control will likely prevent major slip up front, but I would call this an AWD system. Regardless of what we call it, there is no need for a low range when the motors can deliver full torque from a stop.

I’m curious what the differential gearing is, with no transmission they might put very high gearing in the diffs to reduce the motor speed. I’m assuming there is gear reduction in the motors as well, so maybe conventional 3.55 gearing works.
 
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