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White House rolls out $5 billion funding plan to states for electric vehicle chargers
PUBLISHED THU, FEB 10 20225:00 AM ESTUPDATED THU, FEB 10 20226:08 PM EST

Emma Newburger@EMMA_NEWBURGER
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KEY POINTS
  • The Biden administration this week rolled out a plan to allocate $5 billion to states to fund electric vehicle chargers over five years as part of the bipartisan infrastructure package.
  • The historic investment is part of the administration’s broader agenda to combat human-caused climate change and advance the clean energy transition.
  • Despite a rise in EV sales in the U.S. in recent years, the transportation sector is still one of the largest contributors to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
US President Joe Biden, speaks about rebuilding manufacturing on February 8, 2022, from the South Court Auditorium in Eisenhower Executive Office Building, in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)

US President Joe Biden, speaks about rebuilding manufacturing on February 8, 2022, from the South Court Auditorium in Eisenhower Executive Office Building, in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)


The Biden administration this week rolled out a plan to allocate $5 billion to states to fund electric vehicle chargers over five years, as part of the bipartisan infrastructure package that includes $7.5 billion to build a sprawling network of EV charging stations across the country.

The investment is part of the administration’s broader agenda to combat human-caused climate change and advance the clean energy transition. The Biden administration has touted EVs as more affordable for Americans than gas-powered cars and has pledged that half the vehicles sold in the U.S. will be electric or plug-in hybrids by 2030.

The new guidance will help states build a network of EV charging stations along designated alternative fuel corridors on the national highway system, senior administration officials said during a press briefing Wednesday.

U.S. electric vehicle battery production to quadruple by 2025

Despite a rise in EV sales in the U.S. in recent years, the transportation sector is still one of the largest contributors to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, comprising roughly one-third of emissions each year.

Roughly 24% of new vehicles sold worldwide are likely to be fully electric by 2030, according to forecasts from consulting firm Alix Partners. The U.S. is the world’s third-largest market for EVs behind China and Europe.

“We’re not going to go electric fast enough if we don’t have the ability to eliminate range anxiety for people and to be able to have them plug in wherever they live, wherever they work, wherever they want to head,” Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm said during a speech in Washington, D.C., on Thursday.

The program to build out charging stations could save an average driver who uses an electric vehicle up to $1,000 each year on gasoline, President Joe Biden said. Tritium, an Australian company that makes EV chargers, is set to build a manufacturing facility in Tennessee that will produce up to 30,000 chargers each year and create 500 local jobs.

Under the plan, entitled the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Formula Program, states must submit their EV infrastructure deployment plans to the Joint Office of Energy and Transportation by Aug. 1. The Federal Highway Administration will approve eligible plans by Sept. 30.

“It’s going to help ensure that America leads the world on electric vehicles,” the president said during a speech earlier this week to promote American companies expanding EV infrastructure in the U.S.

“China has been leading the race up to now, but this is about to change,” Biden said. “Because America is building convenient, reliable, equitable national public charging networks. So wherever you live, charging an electric vehicle will be quick and easy.”

Officials during the call Wednesday said they will unveil guidance on the other $2.5 billion for EV charging stations as part of the bipartisan infrastructure plan later this year. That funding will involve discretionary grants for corridor and community EV charging.

The administration has previously proposed an EV incentive package that would allocate additional money for consumers who bought electric vehicles built by unionized workers. The administration has also committed to replace its federal fleet of 600,000 cars and trucks to electric power by 2035.

“This announcement demonstrates that clean energy investments deliver for America,” Elizabeth Gore, senior vice president of political affairs at the Environmental Defense Fund, said in a statement.

“Building out a national network of charging stations will mean less pollution, more jobs and cleaner cars,” Gore said. “It will also allow more Americans to skip paying at the pump by making electric vehicles a practical choice for more working families.”
 

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from President Biden, USDOT and USDOE Announce $5 Billion over Five Years for National EV Charging Network, Made Possible by Bipartisan Infrastructure Law | FHWA

President Biden, USDOT and USDOE Announce $5 Billion over Five Years for National EV Charging Network, Made Possible by Bipartisan Infrastructure Law
Thursday, February 10, 2022
Joint Energy and Transportation Office and DriveElectric.gov Available to Assist States with Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Deployment Plans
FHWA 05-22
Contact: [email protected]
Tel: (202) 366-0660

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Departments of Transportation and Energy today announced nearly $5 billion that will be made available under the new National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) Formula Program established by President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, to build out a national electric vehicle charging network, an important step towards making electric vehicle (EV) charging accessible to all Americans.

The program will provide nearly $5 billion over five years to help states create a network of EV charging stations along designated Alternative Fuel Corridors, particularly along the Interstate Highway System. The total amount available to states in Fiscal Year 2022 under the NEVI Formula Program is $615 million. States must submit an EV Infrastructure Deployment Plan before they can access these funds. A second, competitive grant program designed to further increase EV charging access in locations throughout the country, including in rural and underserved communities, will be announced later this year.

“A century ago, America ushered in the modern automotive era; now America must lead the electric vehicle revolution,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg. “The President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law will help us win the EV race by working with states, labor, and the private sector to deploy a historic nationwide charging network that will make EV charging accessible for more Americans.”

“We are modernizing America’s national highway system for drivers in cities large and small, towns and rural communities, to take advantage of the benefits of driving electric,” said U.S. Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm. “The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is helping states to make electric vehicle charging more accessible by building the necessary infrastructure for drivers across America to save money and go the distance, from coast-to-coast.”

Today’s news follows President Biden’s announcement earlier this week on EV manufacturing, and the White House Fact Sheet on actions taken to date to prepare for this historic EV investment.

To access these new Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funds – and to help ensure a convenient, reliable, affordable, and equitable charging experience for all users – each state is required to submit an EV Infrastructure Deployment Plan to the new Joint Office of Energy and Transportation that describes how the state intends to use its share of NEVI Formula Program funds consistent with Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) guidance.

These plans are expected to build on Alternative Fuel Corridors that nearly every state has designated over the past six years of this program. These corridors will be the spine of the new national EV charging network. The Joint Office will play a key role in the implementation of the NEVI Formula Program by providing direct technical assistance and support to help states develop their plans before they are reviewed and approved by the Federal Highway Administration, which administers the funding.

“Americans need to know that they can purchase an electric vehicle and find convenient charging stations when they are using Interstates and other major highways,” Deputy Federal Highway Administrator Stephanie Pollack said. “The new EV formula program will provide states with the resources they need to provide their residents with reliable access to an EV charging station as they travel.”

The new Joint Office of Energy and Transportation also launched a new website this week at DriveElectric.gov. There, officials can find links to technical assistance, data and tools for states, and careers. To join the Joint Office and support a future where everyone can ride and drive electric, individuals are encouraged to apply to be an EV charging fellow.

As part of today’s announcement, FHWA released the NEVI Formula Program funding to states that will be available following approval of state plans for Fiscal Year 2022 in addition to the Program Guidance and a Request for Nominations for states to expand their existing Alternative Fuel Corridors. Here is state-by-state NEVI funding for Fiscal Years 2022-2026.

FY 2022 Funding*
StateNational
Electric Vehicle
Formula Program
Alabama 11,738,801
Alaska 7,758,240
Arizona 11,320,762
Arkansas 8,010,850
California 56,789,406
Colorado 8,368,277
Connecticut 7,771,342
Delaware 2,617,339
Dist. of Col. 2,468,807
Florida 29,315,442
Georgia 19,978,342
Hawaii 2,616,956
Idaho 4,425,511
Illinois 21,998,178
Indiana 14,743,125
Iowa 7,604,168
Kansas 5,847,059
Kentucky 10,280,470
Louisiana 10,859,512
Maine 2,856,158
Maryland 9,298,080
Massachusetts 9,397,238
Michigan 16,290,764
Minnesota 10,089,418
Mississippi 7,483,268
Missouri 14,647,722
Montana 6,348,350
Nebraska 4,472,243
Nevada 5,618,414
New Hampshire 2,556,450
New Jersey 15,448,790
New Mexico 5,681,977
New York 25,971,644
North Carolina 16,137,196
North Dakota 3,841,352
Ohio 20,739,853
Oklahoma 9,812,934
Oregon 7,733,679
Pennsylvania 25,386,631
Puerto Rico 2,020,490
Rhode Island 3,383,835
South Carolina 10,360,855
South Dakota 4,363,463
Tennessee 13,074,884
Texas 60,356,706
Utah 5,372,731
Vermont 3,140,247
Virginia 15,745,244
Washington 10,489,110
West Virginia 6,761,785
Wisconsin 11,642,061
Wyoming 3,963,841
Total 615,000,000

*Funds available pending approval of state plans.
 

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Where is the funding for the new nuclear power plants to support the additional load on the grid?
Always get a kick out of folks ignoring this issue; it is a biggie. Buying a EV is only a step in helping; the grid must be clean. Nuclear power is a key if you want to be serious in cutting CO2 emissions. I just read a story today that France finally gets it, but more progressive countries need to figure this out.

Few weeks ago, read Germany was trying to get rid of nuclear power which makes zero sense when much of what they get is fossil sources from Russia.....
 

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Nuclear power? Try the Sun (and its wind, tides)! Just need some creative storage solutions for this fusion energy. I think lifting mass during the day and dropping them at night would do https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_battery
Dealing with radioactive materials has turned out to have long term problems for future generations.
 
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Nuclear power? Try the Sun (and its wind, tides)! Just need some creative storage solutions for this fusion energy. I think lifting mass during the day and dropping them at night would do Gravity battery - Wikipedia
Dealing with radioactive materials has turned out to have long term problems for future generations.
I’m imagining a new group of more efficient reactors capable of running on reprocessed spent fuel rods currently sitting in storage around the country. We could solve that waste problem and our carbon emission problem at the same time without the need for new mining and processing operations. Nuclear seems to work perfectly fine on naval vessels, another carbon minimizing option (~3% of global emissions) would be to convert the container and tanker ship fleets to nuclear rather than having them burn heavy bunker oil. I know there is a security and terrorism aspect to the ship application.

The storage issue for solar and wind is a major challenge, supplementing with a known power source (nuclear) for a few decades will smooth transition and implementation.
 

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I’m imagining a new group of more efficient reactors capable of running on reprocessed spent fuel rods currently sitting in storage around the country. We could solve that waste problem and our carbon emission problem at the same time without the need for new mining and processing operations. Nuclear seems to work perfectly fine on naval vessels, another carbon minimizing option (~3% of global emissions) would be to convert the container and tanker ship fleets to nuclear rather than having them burn heavy bunker oil. I know there is a security and terrorism aspect to the ship application.

The storage issue for solar and wind is a major challenge, supplementing with a known power source (nuclear) for a few decades will smooth transition and implementation.
The problem is there is a long road from your imagining to actual implementation. All the suggestions you are making about nuclear have been made for the last few decades and nothing has come of it. Converting the commercial container and tanker fleet to nuclear would be a national security nightmare.

At the same time, there are new solutions coming to market to address storage for solar and wind.
 

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The problem is there is a long road from your imagining to actual implementation. All the suggestions you are making about nuclear have been made for the last few decades and nothing has come of it. Converting the commercial container and tanker fleet to nuclear would be a national security nightmare.

At the same time, there are new solutions coming to market to address storage for solar and wind.
I think it’d be a shorter road to implement reprocessing spent nuclear fuel rods than implementing completely new storage tech that‘s just a concept at this point. The regulatory pressure, constant environmentalist legal challenges, and negative public perception from a small number of accidents made nuclear very expensive and challenging to implement. Combine that with cheap natural gas for the last 20 years and of course there has been little appetite for nuclear. If gas prices doubled I’d bet we’d see some more interest in both nuclear and renewables.

I don’t believe we have enough raw materials to make all the batteries needed to power the grid overnight. Storing water and using gravity for power has worked well for a long time while being carbon neutral, but hydropower has plenty of protesters concerned about the humpback chub or other endangered species.
 
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