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It seems when the ordering process started last week I read there was supposed to be an upcoming document from Ford to give to our electricians about what exactly is needed for the 80 amp Charge Station Pro so they can do a proper install with the transfer switch and other items needed. Does anyone know if this document exists yet or when it may appear?
 

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me too. I was just looking at the recently added (to the web page) that shows a 320A service is required for the 80a ford charge station pro. I'm checking with my electrician to find out what mine is but I'm pretty sure it's only 200A which is most common for my 2800sq/ft home.
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I think this has to do with an issue that was recently mentioned on this forum. National Electrical Code apparently limits the current from a generator to be no more than 25% of the rated busbar capacity of the main panel. So 80A/25% = 320A. Now, it's not yet clear to me if you have a 400A panel but only a 200A service if that would meet NEC requirements. But since most people don't put in a 400A panel unless they are getting 400A service, it probably doesn't matter much. Not many people are going to be able to take advantage of the 80A power export unless there's some exception based on the use of automatic transfer switches.
Curious if anyone knows what the typical cost is to upgrade service from 200A to 400A. I know that's like asking how long a rope is, and it depends on the situation, but my guess is this is a $5-$10k cost for the "average" home owner.
 

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I think this has to do with an issue that was recently mentioned on this forum. National Electrical Code apparently limits the current from a generator to be no more than 25% of the rated busbar capacity of the main panel. So 80A/25% = 320A. Now, it's not yet clear to me if you have a 400A panel but only a 200A service if that would meet NEC requirements. But since most people don't put in a 400A panel unless they are getting 400A service, it probably doesn't matter much. Not many people are going to be able to take advantage of the 80A power export unless there's some exception based on the use of automatic transfer switches.
Curious if anyone knows what the typical cost is to upgrade service from 200A to 400A. I know that's like asking how long a rope is, and it depends on the situation, but my guess is this is a $5-$10k cost for the "average" home owner.
I think (hope) your on the right track. I have a call into my electrician to find out what my service is. I could have a 400a panel as I have a separate 100a panel in my woodshop but I will post what I find out.
 

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I think (hope) your on the right track. I have a call into my electrician to find out what my service is. I could have a 400a panel as I have a separate 100a panel in my woodshop but I will post what I find out.
I've been doing some additional research and I think this is defined in NEC Article 705 for grid-interactive systems. If the truck can export power in parallel with the grid, then the main panel has to be rated for the combined load of the main breaker plus the generator. Technically, the main breaker plus the generator can exceed the panel rating by 20%, so this rule is referred to in PV industry as the 120% rule.

That said, I think the graphic saying you need "320A service" is a little confusing. I think they mean you need a 320 Class meter. The 320 refers to the maximum continuous current (i.e. 320A) but the breaker and meter socket is rated at 80% of it's peak load, so a 320 Class meter is really a 400A peak service. If you open your main panel, you would see 2x 200A breakers, not 2x 160A breakers.

At the end of the day, I think they are trying to say you need a 400A service with a 320 Class meter. You can go look at your meter and it should have some lettering on it. If it says CL200, it's a 200A continuous (240A peak) service. If it says CL320, it's a 320A continuous (400A peak) service.

If you have a CL200 service, you could theoretically make it work but you'd have to downgrade your main breaker to 150A. That might work if you don't have a lot of other loads in the panel but it's not going to work for a lot of people. Especially those with big loads like electric ovens, water heaters, heat pumps, spas/pools, etc.
 

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I have a 100A panel and service and I was planning to upgrade to 200A for this charger. I guess that would not even be enough. I will probably just get a manual transfer switch instead if a 400A panel and service is needed. I only need backup power once or twice per year.
 

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I have a 100A panel and service and I was planning to upgrade to 200A for this charger. I guess that would not even be enough. I will probably just get a manual transfer switch instead if a 400A panel and service is needed. I only need backup power once or twice per year.
Interesting question there: is the 320/400A service no longer required if a manual switch is used?
 

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Interesting question there: is the 320/400A service no longer required if a manual switch is used?
I think that because the charger can switch between charging the truck and powering the home automatically, it’s considered a standby system running in parallel with the grid so the 120% rule applies. You could probably use the 240V outlet in the truck to connect to a transfer switch just like you would a portable generator and you wouldn’t have to worry about your service entrance size.
One other “fun” fact. The 120% rule only applies if your main breaker is on one end of the breaker panel and your back feed breaker for the charger is on the other end of the panel. If your main breakers are in the middle of the panel (like mine are), you can’t go to 120%. So you really would need a 320A service.
 

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Interesting question there: is the 320/400A service no longer required if a manual switch is used?
A manual transfer switch combined with a critical loads panel would isolate the generator from the main breaker and the utility service, so there should be no requirement for their max amperage.

Also, I would connect the 7.2kW pro power to the manual transfer switch. That is only 30A. That should be enough for my fridge, lights, router, and TV.
 

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Sounds like if you want send power to the grid you will need a 320 amp service. I have a 16kw generator with automatic transfer switch and did not need to upgrade my service.
Do you mean send power to your house? The last thing you’d want to do is send power to the grid during an emergency.
 
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As mentioned before I have an automatic transfer switch so my whole house generator sends no power to the grid. I also have solar some people sell power to the grid (I don't) but some do. If you send no power to the grid when it is working and not down what difference does it make what your meter and service panel make.
 

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talked to my electrician and confirmed that I only have 200a service but he couldn't offer anything else without a lot more detailed information on Ford's requirements. He said they wouldn't normally put 320a service unless the home is roughly 4000sq/ft or more. So seems to me that 320a service makes this useless that is stricly for the Smart" feature... control from your phone. If it means 200a works finephysically plugging into a transfer switch like I did with my portable generator, Then I'm fine with that.
 

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I'm curious how this wires in too. It would have to be a disconnect between the grid and your panel just like a whole house generator transfer switch. Which means the power company will have to come out and disconnect the power for this to be wired in.

I just put in a 200a panel and automatic transfer with a 20A generator and never dreamed I would need a bigger panel.

Also I'll have to see what my current load is drawing, may not have 80A left for charger.
 

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As mentioned before I have an automatic transfer switch so my whole house generator sends no power to the grid. I also have solar some people sell power to the grid (I don't) but some do. If you send no power to the grid when it is working and not down what difference does it make what your meter and service panel make.
Your generator is considered an emergency backup system and only operates when the grid is down. So it’s covered by Article 702 and has different requirements. The Ford Pro charger is a Standby System that can operate when the grid is up. So it’s covered by Article 705 and has the 120% rule.
I think most people want to use the truck as an emergency back up system so it’s unfortunate that the charger can’t be configured this way to avoid the service requirements.
 
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