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2021 Mustang Mach E First Edition, 2016 Nissan Leaf, 2003 Toyota Tacoma, F-150 Lightning reserved
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Musk confirms Tesla Roadster delayed to 2023, Cybertruck to 2022
Stephen Edelstein
STEPHEN EDELSTEIN SEPTEMBER 2, 2021


Tesla CEO Elon Musk on Wednesday confirmed delays for one of the company's most-anticipated new vehicles. The second-generation Tesla Roadster has been delayed to 2023, Musk confirmed via Twitter. It's also unlikely that we'll see Cybertruck production start on schedule.

Musk said chip shortages were the problem, claiming they were holding up the launch of new products.

The Roadster was originally revealed in November 2017 and due by 2020. At the time, Musk quoted impressive specifications, including 0-60 mph in 1.9 seconds, a 250-mph top speed, and 620 miles of range from a 250-kwh battery pack.

Tesla almost immediately began accepting $50,000 reservations for the standard Roadster, which has a $200,000 price tag. To get one of the first Founders Series models, customers have to put up that version's full $250,000 price.

However, Tesla's battery claims for both the Roadster and Semi (which was unveiled alongside the Roadster) puzzled analysts. As the Roadster's planned 2020 launch drew closer, Musk also admitted that engineering work wouldn't be finished in time, but doubled down on bold claims. Earlier this year he teased rocket tech for the Roadster and said that Tesla was "finishing engineeing" in 2021, followed by production in 2022.

The Roadster and Semi aren't the only products that have been on hold well beyond their original due dates. Tesla's order page and customer communications have indicated for a couple of months that first Cybertruck deliveries will happen in early 2022, not late 2021.

Tesla Cybertruck
Tesla Cybertruck

Musk had already hinted in July that the Model Y “obviously does take priority over the Cybertruck”—referring to the ramp at the company's Texas plant, where Model Y production will follow a new cast-body process.

At least the Roadster, Semi, and Cybertruck are still ostensibly in the queue for production. Earlier this year, Tesla abruptly cancelled the Model S Plaid+ ahead of its launch event. This range-topping model was supposed to combine the performance of the Model S Plaid with a 520-mile range.
 

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This actually is not good news for us as buyers. We rely on competition between Ford and Tesla trucks to keep prices down. I have reservations on both the CyberTruck and the Lightning. Hoped to drive each before buying. Overall usability, comfort with driving position, and overall cost would determine which I buy. But if CyberT is delayed and I have early access to a Lightning at sticker price, this will be the first Ford I ever purchase. Absent price competition from Tesla, if Ford raises the price, then Rivian becomes a contender.
 

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2021 Mustang Mach-e, 2020 Ford F-150 Raptor, Fully Restored 2000 Jeep Wrangler off road
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Musk confirms Tesla Roadster delayed to 2023, Cybertruck to 2022
Stephen Edelstein
STEPHEN EDELSTEIN
SEPTEMBER 2, 2021


Tesla CEO Elon Musk on Wednesday confirmed delays for one of the company's most-anticipated new vehicles. The second-generation Tesla Roadster has been delayed to 2023, Musk confirmed via Twitter. It's also unlikely that we'll see Cybertruck production start on schedule.

Musk said chip shortages were the problem, claiming they were holding up the launch of new products.

The Roadster was originally revealed in November 2017 and due by 2020. At the time, Musk quoted impressive specifications, including 0-60 mph in 1.9 seconds, a 250-mph top speed, and 620 miles of range from a 250-kwh battery pack.

Tesla almost immediately began accepting $50,000 reservations for the standard Roadster, which has a $200,000 price tag. To get one of the first Founders Series models, customers have to put up that version's full $250,000 price.

However, Tesla's battery claims for both the Roadster and Semi (which was unveiled alongside the Roadster) puzzled analysts. As the Roadster's planned 2020 launch drew closer, Musk also admitted that engineering work wouldn't be finished in time, but doubled down on bold claims. Earlier this year he teased rocket tech for the Roadster and said that Tesla was "finishing engineeing" in 2021, followed by production in 2022.

The Roadster and Semi aren't the only products that have been on hold well beyond their original due dates. Tesla's order page and customer communications have indicated for a couple of months that first Cybertruck deliveries will happen in early 2022, not late 2021.

Tesla Cybertruck
Tesla Cybertruck

Musk had already hinted in July that the Model Y “obviously does take priority over the Cybertruck”—referring to the ramp at the company's Texas plant, where Model Y production will follow a new cast-body process.

At least the Roadster, Semi, and Cybertruck are still ostensibly in the queue for production. Earlier this year, Tesla abruptly cancelled the Model S Plaid+ ahead of its launch event. This range-topping model was supposed to combine the performance of the Model S Plaid with a 520-mile range.
Well this is a shock! The roadster is late! The Cybertruck is late! Who would’ve guessed! :rolleyes:
 

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This actually is not good news for us as buyers. We rely on competition between Ford and Tesla trucks to keep prices down. I have reservations on both the CyberTruck and the Lightning. Hoped to drive each before buying. Overall usability, comfort with driving position, and overall cost would determine which I buy. But if CyberT is delayed and I have early access to a Lightning at sticker price, this will be the first Ford I ever purchase. Absent price competition from Tesla, if Ford raises the price, then Rivian becomes a contender.
Welcome to the forum @D.E.Mitchel! The Silverado EV might be something for us to keep an eye out depending on when Chevy and GM release it. I'd say the Ram EV too but that's not coming until 2024.

How would you spec the Lightning?
 

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Welcome to the forum @D.E.Mitchel! The Silverado EV might be something for us to keep an eye out depending on when Chevy and GM release it. I'd say the Ram EV too but that's not coming until 2024.

How would you spec the Lightning?
OK challenge accepted.
My use case is I am retired, now a slow motion home remodeller/flipper. So I don't want something that attracts attention to the vehicle. I want function. If they made an electric 3 window 1948 Chevy one ton, or an electric Dodge power wagon with steel headlight guards I would be all in.

1). 300 mile battery. That means the most. It's a big vehicle and will swallow the kilowatts to get down the road. Daily use range I would keep it between 50 to 200 miles on the battery, recharge slowly at night. On longer trips with a 250 to 350 kWh charger, you will get 200 miles into the big battery the fastest. That puts you back out on the highway quicker, or gives you the option to charge to 95% for the long 275 mile stretch ahead with no charger showing on the map.

2). Freeway driver assist, under whatever name. 360 or Autopilot. I definitely want lane assist, variable speed control and blind side awareness. Virtual surround camera based vision is a huge bonus.

Everything below is secondary to a big battery and driver assist

3). Weather and casual thief cover on the bed. Aftermarket is better.
4). Powered seat adjustment and seat warmer, driver and passenger.
5). 18 inch wheels with taller, narrower tires = quieter running, better tire life and better miles per kWh. In winter 18 inch rims let you put on chains or snow tires that actually work.
6). Decent step rail that doesn't let your feet slip in icy conditions.
7). Towing package, better cooling system means fewer problems in hot weather even if not towing.
8). Fold back mirrors.
9). Status of vehicle displayable on my phone.
10). A replacement vehicle when truck is in the shop.

11). Cost. Lowest cost when two vehicles from different companies have the same/comparable feature sets. ( This assumes that there will be two or three companies with trucks being offered in the US market.)

___
Stuff the F150 already has--great aluminum body with experienced body shops who know how to work on aluminum, so insurance companies know what they face on repair costs. Lower weight, excellent corrosion resistance.
A huge aftermarket for accessories.
A dealer network that knows trucks.
Integration with phones. Tesla treats Apple and Android as if they did not exist.
Controls you can identify by touch without taking you eye off the road. My Tesla Model 3 is very distracting to find the adjustment for fan or temperature.

The one thing we can't get yet from the Lightning.
6.5 or 8 foot bed.
Rear axle steering. All wheel steering works really well for tight dirt roads with potholes and also works well in crowded parking lots.
 

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OK challenge accepted.
My use case is I am retired, now a slow motion home remodeller/flipper. So I don't want something that attracts attention to the vehicle. I want function. If they made an electric 3 window 1948 Chevy one ton, or an electric Dodge power wagon with steel headlight guards I would be all in.

1). 300 mile battery. That means the most. It's a big vehicle and will swallow the kilowatts to get down the road. Daily use range I would keep it between 50 to 200 miles on the battery, recharge slowly at night. On longer trips with a 250 to 350 kWh charger, you will get 200 miles into the big battery the fastest. That puts you back out on the highway quicker, or gives you the option to charge to 95% for the long 275 mile stretch ahead with no charger showing on the map.

2). Freeway driver assist, under whatever name. 360 or Autopilot. I definitely want lane assist, variable speed control and blind side awareness. Virtual surround camera based vision is a huge bonus.

Everything below is secondary to a big battery and driver assist

3). Weather and casual thief cover on the bed. Aftermarket is better.
4). Powered seat adjustment and seat warmer, driver and passenger.
5). 18 inch wheels with taller, narrower tires = quieter running, better tire life and better miles per kWh. In winter 18 inch rims let you put on chains or snow tires that actually work.
6). Decent step rail that doesn't let your feet slip in icy conditions.
7). Towing package, better cooling system means fewer problems in hot weather even if not towing.
8). Fold back mirrors.
9). Status of vehicle displayable on my phone.
10). A replacement vehicle when truck is in the shop.

11). Cost. Lowest cost when two vehicles from different companies have the same/comparable feature sets. ( This assumes that there will be two or three companies with trucks being offered in the US market.)

___
Stuff the F150 already has--great aluminum body with experienced body shops who know how to work on aluminum, so insurance companies know what they face on repair costs. Lower weight, excellent corrosion resistance.
A huge aftermarket for accessories.
A dealer network that knows trucks.
Integration with phones. Tesla treats Apple and Android as if they did not exist.
Controls you can identify by touch without taking you eye off the road. My Tesla Model 3 is very distracting to find the adjustment for fan or temperature.

The one thing we can't get yet from the Lightning.
6.5 or 8 foot bed.
Rear axle steering. All wheel steering works really well for tight dirt roads with potholes and also works well in crowded parking lots.
For a truck like this the big battery is an absolute must. I've never been one to use 360 or those driver assists but they are nice to have. The vehicle status should be easily accessible with the ford app, at least for monitoring charging.
 
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