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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've only found one reference in a charging video to an included "mobile" charger. A big deal has been made about the included 80 amp hard wired charger with the extended range battery, but day 1 everyone will need a way to charge at home and for when on the road perhaps. Day 1 most will not have a plan to get the 80 amp home charger wired up. I'm going to put money on the fact that most will never have it wired in due to cost and power requirements of their panel.

So is it true, will every pickup come with the mobile charger? The video I watched showed the one with the MachE and they noted it would come bundled with every truck. I find it hard to believe it wouldn't, but I'm not finding much in the documentation confirming it or I've missed it.

Following in Tesla's footsteps it shows to come with a 120 and 240 volt (14-50) adapters. Tesla has another 5 or 6 pig tails you can buy to match the outlet type you have at home. Tesla has actually quit including the 14-50 like they did the first couple of years, but that is one of the most popular plugs and what I use every day at home for one of the cars. I have a simple 14-50 plug wired into the garage, plug the mobile charger in and your set for 99% of the charges you'll likely need. Toss it in the truck when you leave on a road trip.
 

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I've only found one reference in a charging video to an included "mobile" charger. A big deal has been made about the included 80 amp hard wired charger with the extended range battery, but day 1 everyone will need a way to charge at home and for when on the road perhaps. Day 1 most will not have a plan to get the 80 amp home charger wired up. I'm going to put money on the fact that most will never have it wired in due to cost and power requirements of their panel.

So is it true, will every pickup come with the mobile charger? The video I watched showed the one with the MachE and they noted it would come bundled with every truck. I find it hard to believe it wouldn't, but I'm not finding much in the documentation confirming it or I've missed it.

Following in Tesla's footsteps it shows to come with a 120 and 240 volt (14-50) adapters. Tesla has another 5 or 6 pig tails you can buy to match the outlet type you have at home. Tesla has actually quit including the 14-50 like they did the first couple of years, but that is one of the most popular plugs and what I use every day at home for one of the cars. I have a simple 14-50 plug wired into the garage, plug the mobile charger in and your set for 99% of the charges you'll likely need. Toss it in the truck when you leave on a road trip.
Everythng I've seen so far indicates that it will, just like the Mach E. Some of the reviewers I've seen found it under the floor of the Frunk. I think that is even the case if you get the extended to get the pro charger.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks - I figured as much, but just surprised it isn't laid out a little more clear. This is really what most if not all will need day 1 - or Month 1, 2 and 3 to charge until they evaluate and get other solutions in place. Or just opt to use this day in and day out.
 

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No matter which truck you get you will get the mobile charger. It’s a 32A charge that can run off a NEMA 14-50 240V (dryer) outlet or a standard 120V outlet (very slow).
 
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No matter which truck you get you will get the mobile charger. It’s a 32A charge that can run off a NEMA 14-50 240V (dryer) outlet or a standard 120V outlet (very slow).
Yep. Though most dryers use a NEMA 14-30 outlet similar, but different shaped neutral pin). 14-50s will more commonly be found for electric ovens and RV hookups.
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Interestingly enough - there isn't a 14-30 pig tail shown for it yet. I'm guessing this will be key for the vehicle to vehicle charging if you want to plug into that 240 volt plug in the bed.

https://parts.ford.com/shop/en/us/e...ules/charger-home-station-traction-13359649-1
14-50 is the "new dryer" as compared to the 14-30 "old dryer". I never knew 14-50 was called a dryer outlet until electric chargers. It was news to me a year ago. The reason there Ford doesn't supply a 14-30 pigtail is the charger does not have variable charging rates and so far the Mustang Mach E doesn't either. I'm guessing the Lightning won't as well. So, you can't use a 14-30 pigtail without overloading a 30A circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
14-50 is the "new dryer" as compared to the 14-30 "old dryer". I never knew 14-50 was called a dryer outlet until electric chargers. It was news to me a year ago. The reason there Ford doesn't supply a 14-30 pigtail is the charger does not have variable charging rates and so far the Mustang Mach E doesn't either. I'm guessing the Lightning won't as well. So, you can't use a 14-30 pigtail without overloading a 30A circuit.
Are we sure the mobile charger doesn't know. I think it will based on which pig tail is plugged into it. It has 2 options today and Tesla has 7 or 8. Plus without a 14-30 plug on the radar (or some other new device) we have an issue with the vehicle to vehicle charging. The 110 plug isn't a real option there.
 

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Are we sure the mobile charger doesn't know. I think it will based on which pig tail is plugged into it. It has 2 options today and Tesla has 7 or 8. Plus without a 14-30 plug on the radar (or some other new device) we have an issue with the vehicle to vehicle charging. The 110 plug isn't a real option there.
Yes, those of us with Mustang Mach Es have been checking out these chargers for the last year. It is not the same design as the Tesla. It comes with only two pigtails, one 240v one 120v. There is no indication either the charger or the Mach E can adjust their charging rates when charging on L1/L2.
 
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14-50 is the "new dryer" as compared to the 14-30 "old dryer". I never knew 14-50 was called a dryer outlet until electric chargers. It was news to me a year ago. The reason there Ford doesn't supply a 14-30 pigtail is the charger does not have variable charging rates and so far the Mustang Mach E doesn't either. I'm guessing the Lightning won't as well. So, you can't use a 14-30 pigtail without overloading a 30A circuit.
I believe you’re mistaking NEMA 10-30 for 14-30. 10-30 and 10-50 outlets were 3 pins and were switched over to the 14-XX series with 4 pins to accommodate the separate neutral and ground pins. This switch was made in the 90s.
10-30 = old dryer, 14-30 = current dryer.
 

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Tom Molghney discusses this charger in his videos about charging the Mustang Mach E.
Short version:
Long version:
 

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I believe you’re mistaking NEMA 10-30 for 14-30. 10-30 and 10-50 outlets were 3 pins and were switched over to the 14-XX series with 4 pins to accommodate the separate neutral and ground pins. This switch was made in the 90s.
10-30 = old dryer, 14-30 = current dryer.
Could be. I'm no expert on outlets. All I know is many sources discussing chargers, including Ford, refer to this as a dryer plug. As I said, that was news to me.
 

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Could be. I'm no expert on outlets. All I know is many sources discussing chargers, including Ford, refer to this as a dryer plug. As I said, that was news to me.
Yep, I’ve seen that reference too and complained about it to some of the Team Edison folks. Not sure if they ever corrected that. Maybe it can be used for dryers? No idea. Never seen it though.
 

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They must be including something with the truck.

So with the 80% rule I’ll need a 60 amp breaker for the 48 amp L2 charger. Hopefully my 100 amp main can support that, fortunately my house is mostly natural gas.
 

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Charging is not complicated, but owners may be confused as to what type/size of outlet they will need to be able to 'plug in' at home - Ford is trying to make it easy to do EITHER a simple household outlet, which we are all accustomed to, OR the much faster charge option of a 240v outlet, which some refer to as a NEMA14-50 large 4-prong special outlet.
Yes, the larger 14-50 outlet is not something you see everyday, but you just may already have one, or even more than one, in your home. Typically, new electric clothes dryers use a NEMA 14-50, or even some 'plug in' Ovens and Ranges may use a NEMA 14-50 outlet.
While you're probably not going to be anywhere CLOSE enough to use either one of those existing outlets, and since they are IN the home, you'll want to explore the option of installing/wiring one to near where your vehicle will be parked. It's not rocket science, but it is different enough from 'regular' outlet wiring that most will not tackle it themselves.
I, on the other hand, traveled FULL TIME in our motorhome for over 5 years and am WELL acquainted with the RV Campground NEMA 14--50 240v outlet for larger motorhomes. I've plugged in to MANY over the years, and I've wired SEVERAL at private camp sites in the past, so I have no aversion to doing it myself.
For most folks, though, you might want to check with several local electricians to price one for your home. I would also suggest that you tell them that you don't need a re-wiring of your home, and don't want also to have to 'upgrade' your electrical panel - you simply want an easy way to use your existing home's power to charge your vehicle overnight. Electricians do have work within codes and rules, so don't expect their answer to be simple, but some electricians can simplify the process and make it much easier and cheaper. It's not rocket-science, it's just another outlet.
 

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They must be including something with the truck.

So with the 80% rule I’ll need a 60 amp breaker for the 48 amp L2 charger. Hopefully my 100 amp main can support that, fortunately my house is mostly natural gas.
I see no need or requirement for a 60amp breaker since a NEMA14-50 outlet, by it's own manufacture, it's designed as a 50amp device. A double-pole 50amp breaker is all you need, just like any motorhome or large RV that uses these at campgrounds - they work from their 50amp panel. A 48amp L2 charger is MAX at 48 amps per side, it will never exceed 50amps. period.
 

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I see no need or requirement for a 60amp breaker since a NEMA14-50 outlet, by it's own manufacture, it's designed as a 50amp device. A double-pole 50amp breaker is all you need, just like any motorhome or large RV that uses these at campgrounds - they work from their 50amp panel. A 48amp L2 charger is MAX at 48 amps per side, it will never exceed 50amps. period.
48A EVSEs typically need to be hardwired and in some rare circumstances may come with a plug intended for use on NEMA 14-60 outlets, as they require a 60A circuit due to the 80% rule @BroncoAZ mentioned. You can use 40A EVSEs on 14-50 outlets with a 50A circuit with a 50A breaker, and you will see 32A EVSEs, like the Ford Mobile Charger, with 14-50 outlets so they can also be used on 40A circuits. Typically the outlet size coincides with the circuit/breaker size, but the 14-50 outlet can be used for both 50 and 40 Amp applications. I’ve got a 40A 14-50 outlet for my oven for example.
 

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there is no 'rule' that a device that requires 48amps be on a 60amp outlet/breaker/circuit, you are confusing issues related to whether OTHER items may also be drawing from that same circuit. A 12amp device obviously needs a 15amp outlet/circuit, but only because that is the next 'higher' breaker that is available, otherwise a 13amp breaker would work just fine. Yes, if other items and devices are on the same circuit, and could be used at the same time, then having more 'room' makes sense, but when a SINGLE device, like a EV charger, is on a DEDICATED 240v circuit, then NO, the 50amp double-pole breaker IS the correct size.
A breaker is designed to simply be an 'on/off' switch - for the purposes of controlling the 'heat' within a circuit's wiring, if it were to exceed the wires capabilities. There is nothing else that needs to be considered, whether 80% or 60% or any other 'made up' number. The facts are the facts, period. If a 6awg wire is designed to handle 50amps of continuous power, or HEAT that it creates, then it is the right size for that situation. If a 50amp breaker is designed to trip at or after 50amps of continuous power, or HEAT that is created, then it is the right size to protect that wire. If your EV's maximum draw thru your power system is 48 amps, then you'll never see that 50amp breaker trip... nothing else is needing power at the same time on that same circuit: no '80% rule' is going to change that.

The reality is that Ford is providing the correct NEMA14-50 adapter, to fit a correct NEMA14-50 outlet, wired with 6awg 50amp wire, to a 50amp double-pole breaker, for a 48amp EV charger. If you have decided that you 'really' need a 60amp breaker, then you have defeated the very purpose of a breaker - to protect the wire from overload. If you wire has an issue, a break, a short, etc., and amperage exceeds 50amps, you won't have any protection until it reaches pass 60amps, instead. That's not the correct assumption of how a breaker should work for your protection. You want the CLOSEST breaker size to the draw of your device.
 

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there is no 'rule' that a device that requires 48amps be on a 60amp outlet/breaker/circuit, you are confusing issues related to whether OTHER items may also be drawing from that same circuit. A 12amp device obviously needs a 15amp outlet/circuit, but only because that is the next 'higher' breaker that is available, otherwise a 13amp breaker would work just fine. Yes, if other items and devices are on the same circuit, and could be used at the same time, then having more 'room' makes sense, but when a SINGLE device, like a EV charger, is on a DEDICATED 240v circuit, then NO, the 50amp double-pole breaker IS the correct size.
A breaker is designed to simply be an 'on/off' switch - for the purposes of controlling the 'heat' within a circuit's wiring, if it were to exceed the wires capabilities. There is nothing else that needs to be considered, whether 80% or 60% or any other 'made up' number. The facts are the facts, period. If a 6awg wire is designed to handle 50amps of continuous power, or HEAT that it creates, then it is the right size for that situation. If a 50amp breaker is designed to trip at or after 50amps of continuous power, or HEAT that is created, then it is the right size to protect that wire. If your EV's maximum draw thru your power system is 48 amps, then you'll never see that 50amp breaker trip... nothing else is needing power at the same time on that same circuit: no '80% rule' is going to change that.

The reality is that Ford is providing the correct NEMA14-50 adapter, to fit a correct NEMA14-50 outlet, wired with 6awg 50amp wire, to a 50amp double-pole breaker, for a 48amp EV charger. If you have decided that you 'really' need a 60amp breaker, then you have defeated the very purpose of a breaker - to protect the wire from overload. If you wire has an issue, a break, a short, etc., and amperage exceeds 50amps, you won't have any protection until it reaches pass 60amps, instead. That's not the correct assumption of how a breaker should work for your protection. You want the CLOSEST breaker size to the draw of your device.
The NEC electrical code has that rule. See section 625 for the specifics on EV applications. 125% of 48A is 60A.

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