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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, enough of my pity party.....I want to ask some real world questions about expect cold weather range.

I live in Sioux Fall, SD and regularly drive to Fargo, ND even during winter. Currently, I-29 is a DC fast charger ghost land from Sioux Falls to Fargo (240 miles). (planned 50 kW charger being built in Brookings, SD probably opening this summer, and Elon has a 350 kW flame thrower in Watertown not yet open to Ford.....)

So, this is an 80 mph interstate and I could often be driving when it is 10 degrees F. What kind of range should I expect?
 

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There is some talk of that in this thread: PTL At The Pittsburgh Auto Show: Ford Lightning

But those are talking about smaller Teslas and the Mach E. The weight of the vehicle and the aero makes me wonder about the mi/kWh. If you get that number you can more easily determine what you will get on that drive.

I would want to talk to someone with a Rivian right now to compare. There is someone in my area but I drive by them so I don't know where they are exactly. Range would drop, especially with that much highway driving and if you plan on doing the 80 mph speed limit...or more. With the 300 mile Ford estimate, you could make it in one shot and charge near the location if you drive with the right conditions (warming the vehicle up, driving reasonably). that long of a drive I don't know how much you could get away with not using the heat. That is going to be your biggest source of drain outside of the motors. The bar on the trip meter goes 1) driving, 2) Heating 3) external temp 4) accessories.

I'm assuming you are going for an ER.
 

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Okay, enough of my pity party.....I want to ask some real world questions about expect cold weather range.

I live in Sioux Fall, SD and regularly drive to Fargo, ND even during winter. Currently, I-29 is a DC fast charger ghost land from Sioux Falls to Fargo (240 miles). (planned 50 kW charger being built in Brookings, SD probably opening this summer, and Elon has a 350 kW flame thrower in Watertown not yet open to Ford.....)

So, this is an 80 mph interstate and I could often be driving when it is 10 degrees F. What kind of range should I expect?
Hard to say since we don't have EPA numbers yet. You could easily see a 30-40% reduction due to temperature and a bit more due to the high speed. Usually when you use DC Fast Charge, you only charge up to about 80% -- we've yet to see a charging curve either, so it may go to 90 before hitting the cliff.

Driving 80mph at 10°F you probably aren't going to get 240 miles.
 

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I'm not one with the calculator and pencil and fancy formulas, but if the perfect range is 300, then I'm going to say no, especially if you have any kind of head wind. That 50kW hour charger is going to be your friend until Elon gets a share of those billions from the gov't and he decides to open the "Flamethrowers." This is also the scenario where I believe Ford could have done better with the 150kW max charging. It could make a difference of 10 minutes vs 20 or so you need to be at that SC if indeed they are someday opened up.
 

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So after I typed my bit I thought about just messaging the local chat and I got a response. The one person that I see driving around stated that they are currently getting 300 miles at 90% charge. 135kw battery. Which roughly comes to 2.4 mi/kWh. I don't know if they stare at their trip meter like I do in the Mach E or where they are going in the area but they don't have an out of town commute. I also don't know their driving habits.

I also didn't realize that the Rivian R1T is heavier than the Lightning. So 2.5 mi/kWh with the Lightning would get you 324 at 100% and 262 at 80%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So after I typed my bit I thought about just messaging the local chat and I got a response. The one person that I see driving around stated that they are currently getting 300 miles at 90% charge. 135kw battery. Which roughly comes to 2.4 mi/kWh. I don't know if they stare at their trip meter like I do in the Mach E or where they are going in the area but they don't have an out of town commute. I also don't know their driving habits.

I also didn't realize that the Rivian R1T is heavier than the Lightning. So 2.5 mi/kWh with the Lightning would get you 324 at 100% and 262 at 80%.
Promising, but I doubt that going 80 mph....
 

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I am in Manitoba....so I am guessing sort of similar weather, if not cooler. I will give you some numbers based on my non-scientific experience for a 2021 Kona EV equipped with a heat pump. Keep in mind, in winter testing the Kona is one of the top EVs in the market today to deal with cold weather (because of the heat pump design, etc...)

Some parameters for you:
I always preheat the battery/cabin prior to travelling the vehicle in the winter...
I drive mostly at highway speeds 110km (68mph) because I work from home
Very few opportunities to recoup energy since my drive is mostly all flat
  • Range +50F
    • 465km (288 miles) - I know, above EPA but this is fairly consistent...I think the heat pump helps a lot at these temps
  • Range between 32F-50F
    • 415km (257 miles)
  • Range between 10F-32F
    • 300km (186 miles) - I think at this point the heat pump starts to lose efficiency and aux heating needs to come on more often
  • Range between -4F-10F
    • 280km (173 miles)
  • Range below -4F
    • 240km (149 miles)
 

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I am in Manitoba....so I am guessing sort of similar weather, if not cooler. I will give you some numbers based on my non-scientific experience for a 2021 Kona EV equipped with a heat pump. Keep in mind, in winter testing the Kona is one of the top EVs in the market today to deal with cold weather (because of the heat pump design, etc...)

Some parameters for you:
I always preheat the battery/cabin prior to travelling the vehicle in the winter...
I drive mostly at highway speeds 110km (68mph) because I work from home
Very few opportunities to recoup energy since my drive is mostly all flat
  • Range +50F
    • 465km (288 miles) - I know, above EPA but this is fairly consistent...I think the heat pump helps a lot at these temps
  • Range between 32F-50F
    • 415km (257 miles)
  • Range between 10F-32F
    • 300km (186 miles) - I think at this point the heat pump starts to lose efficiency and aux heating needs to come on more often
  • Range between -4F-10F
    • 280km (173 miles)
  • Range below -4F
    • 240km (149 miles)
You have the 64kWh battery? And those are 80% or 100%.
 

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Ford announced the trucks come with a 98 or 131 kWh USABLE battery. Head space will be above that.
Font Rectangle Screenshot Technology Number
 

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Could you explain your calculation? Has Ford announced what sort of headroom or buffer they are going to reserve in the pack?
324/131 = 2.4
 

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Real world experience with my VW ID.4....Took delivery in June, averaged 3.67 miles per kWh from June through August. Averaged 2.45 miles per kWh, September through December. Have averaged 1.85 miles per kWh, January through present. Cold weather hurts. The VW is a lot more aerodynamic than the F150, and weights in at around 4500 lbs. Think we'll be doing good to get 1.5 miles per kWh in winter, with our Lightnings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Real world experience with my VW ID.4....Took delivery in June, averaged 3.67 miles per kWh from June through August. Averaged 2.45 miles per kWh, September through December. Have averaged 1.85 miles per kWh, January through present. Cold weather hurts. The VW is a lot more aerodynamic than the F150, and weights in at around 4500 lbs. Think we'll be doing good to get 1.5 miles per kWh in winter, with our Lightnings.
Where do you live? Trying to get a f⁷eel for the climate this is from.
 

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I should have mentioned that....Western New York State.
Vermont here. Our Bolt was rated at 4 miles per kWh. In the summer we usually averaged 4.8 to 5.2. in the winter 2.4 to 2.7. it could be lower if the heat was on more, or if the drives were short in the cold. We never took it for long trips. We still have a PHEV Volvo XC90 that we plan on using for trips (my wife feels more comfortable keeping the xc90 for those occasions, but I am tempted to go back down to a two car household). I'd expect the lightning, rated at 2.4m/kWh to get between 1.4 and 2.9 depending on the temperature and the drive time.
 

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Reading back through this old thread, and just want to tip my hat to FM_Jack who basically nailed the EPA rate.....
I guess being hopeful has its upside.
 
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