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YouTube is already inundated with these range and charging issues about F150 Lightning and many discouraged future customers are cancelling their reservations. Got the letter from Ford that I have to do an order by summer 2023 and I'm hesitating to make the order (plus their new upward pricing issues).
I think there are a lot of folks who wish they had reservations are saying they are cancelling their reservations. Lots of internet hot air.

You do need to look realistically at your needs in a truck and decide what is right for you. That's no different than folks have always done when auto shopping.
 

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That's pretty rough. Makes me wish I started out as an electrician!

You might be able to do that on your own. Buy the wire for a 14-50 plug, Buy the plug, run it into your breaker room, buy a 40 or 50 amp breaker, wire it up. that's how I did it. YouTube assisted with every single step. Total cost was a few hundred bucks. Had to drill a couple holes to get the wire from my circuit breaker in the basement to the plug location in the garage, but got it done.
Sounds like a recipe for a fire. undersize that Wire or not fully understand the implications of pulling 50 amps over the length via YouTube, especially if you are trying to get the job done for a couple hundered bucks and drilling a few holes. I’m all for rugged individualism and the diy spirit, but there are somethings best left to professionals, the first of which is 220v ac.
 

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I think there are a lot of folks who wish they had reservations are saying they are cancelling their reservations. Lots of internet hot air.

You do need to look realistically at your needs in a truck and decide what is right for you. That's no different than folks have always done when auto shopping.
It goes without saying for big ticket and so-called hi-tech items. It's called the old fashion value for money -- performance against price in side by side comparison with the competitor offerings.

I'm both in F150 Lightning and Cybertruck forum and monitoring the reported performance of the new F150 owners and car magazines.
 

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Sounds like a recipe for a fire. undersize that Wire or not fully understand the implications of pulling 50 amps over the length via YouTube, especially if you are trying to get the job done for a couple hundered bucks and drilling a few holes. I’m all for rugged individualism and the diy spirit, but there are somethings best left to professionals, the first of which is 220v ac.
You need to make sure you get the proper wire size for the circuit and wire run. You also need to make sure that all of the connections, including wire nuts, have the proper rating. Also make sure you are using a commercial grade NEMA 14-50 outlet as the standard consumer ones aren't made for frequent plugging and unplugging.
 

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You bring to mind a point that I have not seen made in this forum. Since there may be folks new to EVs reading these pages, I want to put out a tip that all you veteran EVrs know:

Simple cord adaptors of the type used in the RV world will not work with your EVSE. I watched a you-tuber try that and was stranded when it did not work. Tagging a 20a 110 adaptor cord onto the end of your 14-50 EVSE plug will just result in the breaker blowing.

The amount your EVSE draws must be able to be adjusted to match the max draw from the outlet being used. Tesla sells one for $200 (dirt cheap) that will do this automatically, which is why I recommend them, even for non-Tesla EVs.

actually, that's not at all what would 'happen' it that situation. A breaker only 'blows'(trips) when it's internal heat gets to a certain point(meaning that the wire leading to it is at a certain temperature)... that's it's job.

If you plug in a NEMA 14-50 'plug'(male end from the EVSE) into a 50amp to 20amp 'adapter', whether for an RV or anything else, the adapter allows the flow of power with no issues.
I'm not sure what 'type' of adapter, plug, breaker, or wiring that this 'you-tuber' was using, so suggesting that simply because one 'you-tuber' may not have known the correct way to access power might not be a good example of why 'not' to use adapters. Adapters are not the problem...owners are.

An adapter simply changes what 'size' outlet you are moving from/to with power, such as from a 120v 20amp household female outlet to a NEMA 14-50 RV or EVSE male, or if you are moving from/to one Voltage to another, such as from 240v to 120v. The main difference is whether the adapter uses BOTH 240v hot wires.
The 'sizing' of an adapter can certainly come into play, as to whether it is sized for a 20amp usage, or 15amp usage, etc., but the adapter itself is simply creating a way to combine two different outlet types.

Yes, you are right on when it comes to MANAGING how you are using your adapters, or your OUTLETS...
so, using a correct sized Adapter to connect your EVSE to an outlet is important, but it does not require some special 'tesla' adapter(which, by the way, is COMPLETELY overpriced and unneeded). You just have to know that your adapter is capable of the amount of Amperage(HEAT) that the run of wiring, and the outlet, is going to provide to the truck during charging.
An adjustable EVSE is the perfect solution to this problem. I am using one RIGHT NOW, to minimize tripping of a campground's breaker, while charging at 240v 16amps rather than the higher 240v 32amps.

Don't confuse 'RV Adapters' with something 'less than' proper for any type of adapting situations, they are not built any differently or any 'less than' others. The term 'RV' is just to suggest that these are used mostly in camping electrical situations - but can be used ANYWHERE an adapter is needed. I use MANY OF THEM.

:50a to 20amp adapter, both a Puck type and a Dogbone type, used to power the Camper while towing

:50a to 30amp adapter, dogbone type, if even needed with only a 30amp 120v outlet available

:DUAL 30amp to 50a 'Y' adapter, used successfully to create 240v power to the EVSE at a campground

:30a to 20amp adapter, both a Puck type and a Dogbone type, used when needed for Camping with only 20amps
etc

all these work just fine, whether when camping or when EVSE Charging...
 

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I came from the RVing world, where finding a NEMA 14-50 240v 50amp for full power to the large coach was not always available - sometimes a 30amp 120v outlet was all we had access to, and a few times, only a 20amp 120v outlet. ADAPTERS are a great backup, although you hope you'll never really need one. But, you never know. Arriving at a charger and 'assuming' you'll charge and be on your way quickly can be easily aggravated by others who've had the same plans. While you can certainly arrive at a gas station and wait a long while to find a fuel pump on holiday weekends when everyone is trying to 'get outta town'... the current DC Fast Charging infrastructure can feel somewhat the same way, MUCH of the time : /
The good news is you can use a 30A to 14-50 adapter to run the Ford Mobile Charger that comes with the truck. While this EVSES looks just like the one supplied with the Mustang Mach E, the EVSE in the Lightning has been downrated to stay under 30A max. That way it won't trip the breaker in the Lightning and can be used to charge an EV from the 30A Pro Power Onboard panel in the bed. That also means you can use it to charge your Lightning from a 220V 30A outlet.
 

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I don't know of too many 240v 30amp outlets out in the wild - and while some will immediately throw in the 'clothes dryer' as one of those, many do not have but 3 prongs, and even the newer dryers with 4 prongs are a different configuration that your typical 30amp adapter - although I actually own one of these myself, which was used several years ago for a 3-pronged 240v dryer to access a 14-50 outlet.(which is the OPPOSITE adaption that what we are discussing)

Yes, there are a lot of possibilities, but campgrounds don't provide 240v 30amp outlets - campground outlets are 120v outlets for 30amp 120v campers.
And, on the same token, there are many owners of 30amp campers that think the NEMA 14-50 outlet is 'only' 20amps more of power... : /
 

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actually, that's not at all what would 'happen' it that situation. A breaker only 'blows'(trips) when it's internal heat gets to a certain point(meaning that the wire leading to it is at a certain temperature)... that's it's job.

If you plug in a NEMA 14-50 'plug'(male end from the EVSE) into a 50amp to 20amp 'adapter', whether for an RV or anything else, the adapter allows the flow of power with no issues.
I'm not sure what 'type' of adapter, plug, breaker, or wiring that this 'you-tuber' was using, so suggesting that simply because one 'you-tuber' may not have known the correct way to access power might not be a good example of why 'not' to use adapters. Adapters are not the problem...owners are.

An adapter simply changes what 'size' outlet you are moving from/to with power, such as from a 120v 20amp household female outlet to a NEMA 14-50 RV or EVSE male, or if you are moving from/to one Voltage to another, such as from 240v to 120v. The main difference is whether the adapter uses BOTH 240v hot wires.
The 'sizing' of an adapter can certainly come into play, as to whether it is sized for a 20amp usage, or 15amp usage, etc., but the adapter itself is simply creating a way to combine two different outlet types.

Yes, you are right on when it comes to MANAGING how you are using your adapters, or your OUTLETS...
so, using a correct sized Adapter to connect your EVSE to an outlet is important, but it does not require some special 'tesla' adapter(which, by the way, is COMPLETELY overpriced and unneeded). You just have to know that your adapter is capable of the amount of Amperage(HEAT) that the run of wiring, and the outlet, is going to provide to the truck during charging.
An adjustable EVSE is the perfect solution to this problem. I am using one RIGHT NOW, to minimize tripping of a campground's breaker, while charging at 240v 16amps rather than the higher 240v 32amps.

Don't confuse 'RV Adapters' with something 'less than' proper for any type of adapting situations, they are not built any differently or any 'less than' others. The term 'RV' is just to suggest that these are used mostly in camping electrical situations - but can be used ANYWHERE an adapter is needed. I use MANY OF THEM.

:50a to 20amp adapter, both a Puck type and a Dogbone type, used to power the Camper while towing

:50a to 30amp adapter, dogbone type, if even needed with only a 30amp 120v outlet available

:DUAL 30amp to 50a 'Y' adapter, used successfully to create 240v power to the EVSE at a campground

:30a to 20amp adapter, both a Puck type and a Dogbone type, used when needed for Camping with only 20amps
etc

all these work just fine, whether when camping or when EVSE Charging...
Welp... I understand what you are saying, but for the sake of accuracy, would you allow me to comment on a couple of points?

  • More advanced circuit breakers use electronic components (semiconductor devices) to monitor current levels rather than simple electrical devices. These elements are a lot more precise, and they shut down the circuit more quickly, but they are also a lot more expensive. For this reason, most houses still use conventional electric circuit breakers.
  • In a conventional circuit breaker, the electricity magnetizes the electromagnet (See How Electromagnets Work to find out why). Increasing current boosts the electromagnet's magnetic force, and decreasing current lowers the magnetism. When the current jumps to unsafe levels, the electromagnet is strong enough to pull down a metal lever connected to the switch linkage. The entire linkage shifts, tilting the moving contact away from the stationary contact to break the circuit. The electricity shuts off.
So no, it is the amperage the device is pulling not the "heat in the wire" (thank god) that will trip the breaker. Hence, if you plug a 32a (a typical "dumb" EVSE) device into a 20a circuit, the breaker should open the circuit. This causes an unsatisfactory result when trying to charge an EV.

You reference an adjustable EVSE to correct this problem. YES! That was exactly my point. Out of curiosity, which one are you using, and how much does it cost? I ask, because whereas there are a number of good options out there, the Tesla adjustable unit is $200, including shipping. I myself have not found a better deal then that, so would love to know if there is one out there.
 

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The good news is you can use a 30A to 14-50 adapter to run the Ford Mobile Charger that comes with the truck. While this EVSES looks just like the one supplied with the Mustang Mach E, the EVSE in the Lightning has been downrated to stay under 30A max. That way it won't trip the breaker in the Lightning and can be used to charge an EV from the 30A Pro Power Onboard panel in the bed. That also means you can use it to charge your Lightning from a 220V 30A outlet.
I would be interested in some clarity on this.

Code dictates that an appliance should not pull more than 24 amps continuous from a 30 amp circuit; and one would certainly not want to violate this with an EVSE, as high temps in the circuit could result. Are you saying that the Ford mobile cord only outputs 24a? If so, that is 8 amps under what most mobile cords put out, making it a poor choice when plugged into a 14-50 outlet. :confused:
 

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From all the videos and posts I have seen it really looks like the Lightnings range that is listed is on the very optimistic side rather than more of the middle ground, where sometimes you get better and sometimes worse. I'm very aware of EV range changes based on speed, conditions and load. My Kona EV is basically EPA rated at 4 miles per Kwh (not sure about exact terminology) or about 255 mile range but I routinely see 3.0 to 5.0 miles per Kwh or 190 to 310 mile range. So at EPA rated 230 mile range the Lightning should average at about 2.4 miles per Kwh. But it seems most I have seen posted average at 2.0. When I initially saw the 230 range I assumed from my EV experience I would see about 190-260 range. I don't have my truck yet
 

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I would be interested in some clarity on this.

Code dictates that an appliance should not pull more than 24 amps continuous from a 30 amp circuit; and one would certainly not want to violate this with an EVSE, as high temps in the circuit could result. Are you saying that the Ford mobile cord only outputs 24a? If so, that is 8 amps under what most mobile cords put out, making it a poor choice when plugged into a 14-50 outlet. :confused:
Good point. I would only use a 220V 30A outlet to charge the Lightning in an emergency. Ditto with using the Lightning's EVSE to charge another EV. I certainly wouldn't make a habit of this.

Graphs showing charging with the Ford Mobile Charger show that electrical draw varies through the charging cycle. It will pulse on at max charging rate for a while, then off or greatly reduced for a while. While the Mustang Mach E EVSE peaks at 32A, the Lightning EVSE peaks at 30A. That prevents the Lightning's 30A breaker from tripping. I'm not sure the cycling of the Lightning's EVSE would average out to a level below 24A, however.
 

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MAXGreen EVSE from amz... about $150... adjustable for 240v from 10a, 16a, 20a, 24a, and the max 32amp...

while you might be technically correct on some newer or advanced circuit breakers, most anyone owning and plugging in an EV are using typical home circuit breakers - HEAT is the key, not amperage. It'd be great if circuit breakers could simply 'tell' your device what it's max output is, but that's not reality. The person plugging something in has to be responsible for making sure the breaker, the wire, and the outlet, is designed for as much 'heat' as the device is going to be asking for. You 'can' plug a 1500w space heater into any typical household outlet, and it will work, at least until something else on that same circuit is also asking for power. The breaker is there to protect the wiring, not the device.
Some folks also quote some type of '80%' rule, but for most any EVSE on it's own dedicated circuit, you need not be concerned about that - the circuit breaker is rated for what it says it is.
 

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Interesting conversation, to say the least. I'll jump in since I am an electrical engineer and have this conversation in many of the classes I teach.
1. All breakers have two trip conditions fault current, which is detected by a magnetic pickup coil in the breaker this is for dead shorts and works very fast.
2. Overload, which is a rise in current beyond the rating of the breaker, and this is a thermal metallic metal that will bend as temp rises. This is your normal overload condition.
Note there are ARC fault breakers that are designed to pick up low-level arc faults that may be missed by the normal breaker fault detection. These are electronic and can tell the difference of switching a load on or off and an actual low-level arc.

When a charger kicks on in the vehicle, it draws a large in-rush current, so the EVSE device needs to limit some of this current so breakers do not get nuisance trips. Breakers can not regulate current they are only protective devices protecting the wiring.
As for the RV question.
KEY DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 30 AND 50 AMPS
  • Plugs on RVs with 30 amp service and 50 amp service differ in design.
    • A 30 amp plug has three prongs – a 120 volt hot wire, a neutral wire and a ground wire – and is generally used on RVs with lower load requirements.
    • A 50 amp plug has four prongs – two 120 volt hot wires, a neutral wire and a ground wire – that supply two separate 50 amp, 120 volt feeds.
  • A 50 amp service RV provides a maximum 12,000 watts.
  • Even with an adapter, your 30 amp service RV won’t receive more power than the 3,600 watts it can handle.
  • Conversely, if you use an adapter for a 50 amp RV, you’ll be limited to 3,600 watts.
 

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Interesting conversation, to say the least. I'll jump in since I am an electrical engineer and have this conversation in many of the classes I teach.
Thanks for stepping in. (y) There have never been continuous residential loads comparable to EVSEs.

"There will be fires."
 

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MAXGreen EVSE from amz... about $150... adjustable for 240v from 10a, 16a, 20a, 24a, and the max 32amp...

while you might be technically correct on some newer or advanced circuit breakers, most anyone owning and plugging in an EV are using typical home circuit breakers - HEAT is the key, not amperage. It'd be great if circuit breakers could simply 'tell' your device what it's max output is, but that's not reality. The person plugging something in has to be responsible for making sure the breaker, the wire, and the outlet, is designed for as much 'heat' as the device is going to be asking for. You 'can' plug a 1500w space heater into any typical household outlet, and it will work, at least until something else on that same circuit is also asking for power. The breaker is there to protect the wiring, not the device.
Some folks also quote some type of '80%' rule, but for most any EVSE on it's own dedicated circuit, you need not be concerned about that - the circuit breaker is rated for what it says it is.
That is a fantastic deal on a MAXgreen unit. They typically run about $250. Can you share a link where you are getting them for that price?

Thanks!
 

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Interesting conversation, to say the least. I'll jump in since I am an electrical engineer and have this conversation in many of the classes I teach.
1. All breakers have two trip conditions fault current, which is detected by a magnetic pickup coil in the breaker this is for dead shorts and works very fast.
2. Overload, which is a rise in current beyond the rating of the breaker, and this is a thermal metallic metal that will bend as temp rises. This is your normal overload condition.
Note there are ARC fault breakers that are designed to pick up low-level arc faults that may be missed by the normal breaker fault detection. These are electronic and can tell the difference of switching a load on or off and an actual low-level arc.

When a charger kicks on in the vehicle, it draws a large in-rush current, so the EVSE device needs to limit some of this current so breakers do not get nuisance trips. Breakers can not regulate current they are only protective devices protecting the wiring.
As for the RV question.
KEY DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 30 AND 50 AMPS
  • Plugs on RVs with 30 amp service and 50 amp service differ in design.
    • A 30 amp plug has three prongs – a 120 volt hot wire, a neutral wire and a ground wire – and is generally used on RVs with lower load requirements.
    • A 50 amp plug has four prongs – two 120 volt hot wires, a neutral wire and a ground wire – that supply two separate 50 amp, 120 volt feeds.
  • A 50 amp service RV provides a maximum 12,000 watts.
  • Even with an adapter, your 30 amp service RV won’t receive more power than the 3,600 watts it can handle.
  • Conversely, if you use an adapter for a 50 amp RV, you’ll be limited to 3,600 watts.
Thank you for weighing in. Great explanation to reduce confusion.
:cool:(y)
 

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Yeah, >300 mile range makes all the difference if actually trying to "road trip", and you make a good case for why.

I own a number of EV's and have been road tripping EV's for a long time. The difference in comfort when I take a >300 mile capable car is significant, and I want to hit on another key point in your story; destination charging. I carry a Tesla Mobile EVSE with the NEMA kit to be able to plug into literally any outlet in America when on the road; even when not driving one of the Teslas. If there is an outlet where I am staying, I can use it.
 
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