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not sure what you mean by "it would have to drop to max of 24 amps on the 30amp plug"... the Ford Mobile Charger is already designed to use 30amps at 240v thru the NEMA 14-50 outlet. What '30 amp adapter' are you referring to?
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
We need another source of power in our barn. A second electrical box would be needed but finding ways around it to use solar in conjunction with electrical. Also need to transport once we move. Here are a couple links I found. Thoughts?.



 

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not sure what you mean by "it would have to drop to max of 24 amps on the 30amp plug"... the Ford Mobile Charger is already designed to use 30amps at 240v thru the NEMA 14-50 outlet. What '30 amp adapter' are you referring to?
I’m referring to the same 30 amp 240 outlet that’s on the back of the truck. The adaptor that comes with the truck converts that to the 14-50 pigtail on the ford travel charger so you can charge other EVs off the truck using the travel charger. I believe the ford travel charger draws 32 amps on the 14-50 pigtail since they are often connected to 6-50 dryer style outlets that sometimes have 40 amp breakers. So based on the 80% rule that’s a max of 32 amps.

So, if connected to a 30 amp 240 (ie off the back of a lightning or generator), the max draw at 80% should be 24 amps.
 

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Me - I prefer the basic Ford Mobile Charger, at 30amps at 240v, as my regular everyday charger. No need for anything more, and, matter of fact, I could probably use my 20amp 240v outlet just as well, or even my exterior 20amp 120v outlet ....
Could you explain how you are going to use the 30 Amp Ford Mobile with a 20 Amp 240V receptacle?
 

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Could you explain how you are going to use the 30 Amp Ford Mobile with a 20 Amp 240V receptacle?
there are many, many 240v adapters out there...
we don't know, yet, whether there is a derating of the amperage with the Mobile Charger, or within the Lightning, to limit the 240v requirements below 30amps, down to 20, or 15, etc. We DO know that the higher cost Charger(48amps) will have that option.

as for the '80% rule', that has nothing to do with the outlet or the wiring or the EVSE, only with breakers, if it's something that concerns you. Personally, if I have a 30amp breaker, I suggest that it's quite capable up to 30amps, and the same for a 50amp breaker.
 

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Ford lists the charger’s 120v application as pulling 12 amps, with 240v being set for 30 amps via a NEMA 14-50 plug.
When I first brought the truck home and plugged the travel charger into a standard 120 outlet in the garage it was only drawing about 600W so go figure. There seems to be some sort of intelligent reduction in draw.

I’m not sure what you mean by “many many” adaptors. This looks like a very simple NEMA 14-50 to NEMA 14-30. I guess the travel charger is designed to limit to 30 amps so it doesn’t overload theoitlet On the truck.
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Ford lists the charger’s 120v application as pulling 12 amps, with 240v being set for 30 amps via a NEMA 14-50 plug.
Charging off the 50 amp plug at home. The truck indicates just under 18 amps into the 366v battery (6.5kW) when plugged into the travel charger. That’s 27amps at 240. Factor in some losses and it’s probably drawing 30 off the mains.
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How does the home charger tune it’s demand rate when attaching the 30amp adaptor to the 50 amp 14-50 plug? My understanding is that the 14-50 pigtail on the travel charger pulls 32 amps. It would have to drop to max of 24 amps on the 30amp plug.

There are no settings on the travel charger.
What do you mean by home charger? The Ford Power Station Pro has switches that can be set to derate the power setting. I've heard they are internal dip switches so you have to open the unit to change them. It is meant to be set once and left that way. It is also designed to be hard-wired, although it may be possible for an electrician to add a plug. I would not recommend doing so because of the bi-directional power options.

Because the Ford Mobile Charger (Mobile Power Cord) does not have settings to adjust the maximum power, you might look into one of the many other chargers (EVSEs) on the market if you need adjustable power.

The Ford Mobile Charger basically has two settings, one when you use the 110v pigtail and another when you use the 220v pigtail.
 

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this is the realistic scenario. Every non primitive campground has 220 for RVs, that you can plug into.
MANY non-primitive campgrounds have 220v power but they don't all have it. You also may have to upgrade to a higher power (and higher cost) site at some campgrounds, especially state parks.
 
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My situation is a little different. Long story short we plan to park the camper for a long extended periods of time and was looking at alternative ways to use electrical in conjunction with solar power to offset the time and cost. We will also have a barndominium with electrical capability.
Put the solar on the barndominium and plug the camper and/or truck into it. For long-term boondocking (camping without power) you might look into roof solar panels or free-standing solar panels that can be deployed onsite. However, these will primarily be to power the camper/trailer, not the truck.
 

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What do you mean by home charger? The Ford Power Station Pro has switches that can be set to derate the power setting. I've heard they are internal dip switches so you have to open the unit to change them. It is meant to be set once and left that way. It is also designed to be hard-wired, although it may be possible for an electrician to add a plug. I would not recommend doing so because of the bi-directional power options.

Because the Ford Mobile Charger (Mobile Power Cord) does not have settings to adjust the maximum power, you might look into one of the many other chargers (EVSEs) on the market if you need adjustable power.

The Ford Mobile Charger basically has two settings, one when you use the 110v pigtail and another when you use the 220v pigtail.
I mean the travel charger because that’s all we have. The FCSP has not shown up yet. The travel charger has two pigtails and no user settings, but also seems to do some voodoo to switch charging rates. I’ve measured ~600W and 1200W off the same 110 pigtail using different outlets in the garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Put the solar on the barndominium and plug the camper and/or truck into it. For long-term boondocking (camping without power) you might look into roof solar panels or free-standing solar panels that can be deployed onsite. However, these will primarily be to power the camper/trailer, not the truck.
Can solar panels be removed and transported at a later time once we decide to move again?.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Put the solar on the barndominium and plug the camper and/or truck into it. For long-term boondocking (camping without power) you might look into roof solar panels or free-standing solar panels that can be deployed onsite. However, these will primarily be to power the camper/trailer, not the truck.
Can I transport solar panels with me once I decide to move and install them again at new residence?.
 

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Can I transport solar panels with me once I decide to move and install them again at new residence?.
technically yes, but i believe this would be cost prohibitive. cause you're paying to take them off your current roof and then you'd be paying basically for a new install at the new location.

whenever i talk to anyone that is interested in solar i always start with dont even consider it unless your planning on living at the place you would have them installed long term. Like 10-20 years. The ROI on installing them is usually around 10 years depending on what state you live in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
technically yes, but i believe this would be cost prohibitive. cause you're paying to take them off your current roof and then you'd be paying basically for a new install at the new location.

whenever i talk to anyone that is interested in solar i always start with dont even consider it unless your planning on living at the place you would have them installed long term. Like 10-20 years. The ROI on installing them is usually around 10 years depending on what state you live in.
Then my other option is adding a second electrical box. Any knowledge or experience on what that might cost?
 
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