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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In EV forums there are always lots of new threads popping up from first time BEV drivers who are all worried or worked up because their Guess-O-Meter (GOM) is showing much less range than they think it should. This will especially happen in colder weather when the range drops. For new EV owners, it is important to understand the GOM and what it will and will not do.

Very simple answer: don't rely on the GOM! It doesn't know where you plan to go or the conditions it needs to calculate the actual range it can go. It will always be highly conservative. Be glad Ford gives you a conservative GOM -- it'll help keep you out of trouble.

How far can your Lightning really go? There are two good ways to find out. Neither is the GOM.

1. Trust the navigation system
Get in the car, turn on navigation, and pick a spot 200-300 miles away. See if it will navigate you there without charging. How much range will it have when you get there? If it can't get there without charging try shorter distances.

Once you have found a place near the end of your range the navigation system will tell you the range the car predicts to be able to go when it knows the distance, likely speed, altitude changes, and weather conditions of your drive. The distance of that drive plus the remaining range (you can trust it best when remaining range is low) will tell you your range.

I've found the Ford navigation system to be very accurate and estimating my real range in my Mustang Mach E.

2. How far do you really go?
You can do the same thing with your normal driving. Charge up and drive it for a while. Drive until you are low on charge upon arriving home or a charging destination. How far do you go before charging and how much range does the car think is left? After you have been driving a while (100+ miles), the GOM's estimate will be based on your recent driving and will be a better estimate of remaining battery range than it was when you first hopped in. Even better, the truck will provide you with an energy efficiency for the trip in miles per kilowatt hour (m/kWh). You can use that to estimate your actual range.

Both of these will tell you your car's real range under real-world conditions.

Don't trust the GOM for anything other than a low-ball estimate. Then be glad Ford chose to do it this way. I've hopped in my Leaf trusting the GOM would get me somewhere, only to learn the GOM was based on slow driving around town. If I hop on a freeway, by GOM estimate starts dropping like a rock and my battery won't get me where I need to go at 70 mph on the interstate. I'd rather start out with a conservative GOM than a wildly optimistic one! Ford's GOM is intentionally conservative.

Finally, when winter comes don't be that EV owner to starts asking if their truck is broken or if Ford installed the wrong battery. Your range will go down in cold weather due to a variety of reasons (there are threads here on that). However, your GOM will go down even faster as Ford's conservative algorithms help to keep you from getting stranded.
 

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In EV forums there are always lots of new threads popping up from first time BEV drivers who are all worried or worked up because their Guess-O-Meter (GOM) is showing much less range than they think it should. This will especially happen in colder weather when the range drops. For new EV owners, it is important to understand the GOM and what it will and will not do.

Very simple answer: don't rely on the GOM! It doesn't know where you plan to go or the conditions it needs to calculate the actual range it can go. It will always be highly conservative. Be glad Ford gives you a conservative GOM -- it'll help keep you out of trouble.

How far can your Lightning really go? There are two good ways to find out. Neither is the GOM.

1. Trust the navigation system
Get in the car, turn on navigation, and pick a spot 200-300 miles away. See if it will navigate you there without charging. How much range will it have when you get there? If it can't get there without charging try shorter distances.

Once you have found a place near the end of your range the navigation system will tell you the range the car predicts to be able to go when it knows the distance, likely speed, altitude changes, and weather conditions of your drive. The distance of that drive plus the remaining range (you can trust it best when remaining range is low) will tell you your range.

I've found the Ford navigation system to be very accurate and estimating my real range in my Mustang Mach E.

2. How far do you really go?
You can do the same thing with your normal driving. Charge up and drive it for a while. Drive until you are low on charge upon arriving home or a charging destination. How far do you go before charging and how much range does the car think is left? After you have been driving a while (100+ miles), the GOM's estimate will be based on your recent driving and will be a better estimate of remaining battery range than it was when you first hopped in. Even better, the truck will provide you with an energy efficiency for the trip in miles per kilowatt hour (m/kWh). You can use that to estimate your actual range.

Both of these will tell you your car's real range under real-world conditions.

Don't trust the GOM for anything other than a low-ball estimate. Then be glad Ford chose to do it this way. I've hopped in my Leaf trusting the GOM would get me somewhere, only to learn the GOM was based on slow driving around town. If I hop on a freeway, by GOM estimate starts dropping like a rock and my battery won't get me where I need to go at 70 mph on the interstate. I'd rather start out with a conservative GOM than a wildly optimistic one! Ford's GOM is intentionally conservative.

Finally, when winter comes don't be that EV owner to starts asking if their truck is broken or if Ford installed the wrong battery. Your range will go down in cold weather due to a variety of reasons (there are threads here on that). However, your GOM will go down even faster as Ford's conservative algorithms help to keep you from getting stranded.
The part about winter driving can't be stressed enough for new EV buyers. If you're in a cold weather area you can't expect to get the same range year-round.
 

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gee, almost like you're speaking from some kind of experience with new EV owners. 🤔

😜
Does keeping the EV in the garage alleviate some of the issue of cold winters if the vehicle is being continuously driven after leaving the garage versus driving say to a destination and leaving outside in the cold for an extended period? Basically does a warm battery stay warm while being drove during cold winter days?
 

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Does keeping the EV in the garage alleviate some of the issue of cold winters if the vehicle is being continuously driven after leaving the garage versus driving say to a destination and leaving outside in the cold for an extended period? Basically does a warm battery stay warm while being drove during cold winter days?
Theoretically it will help since the battery should be slightly warmer before you start on your journey. But you are not going to see very much difference. The more your battery pack warms up while driving the more range you will get from it. And the colder it is outside the bigger the hit on range until the battery warms up. The same can be said if it's too hot outside and the BEV needs energy to keep the batteries cool for normal operation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Theoretically it will help since the battery should be slightly warmer before you start on your journey. But you are not going to see very much difference. The more your battery pack warms up while driving the more range you will get from it. And the colder it is outside the bigger the hit on range until the battery warms up. The same can be said if it's too hot outside and the BEV needs energy to keep the batteries cool for normal operation.
Remember that two other aspects of the cold cut range: higher air density and the use of your resistive heater. You can't do anything about the former but turning down the heat and using the heated seats and steering wheel more will help with the latter.

Winter precipitation is also hard on range -- in fact any precipitation is.
 

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Does keeping the EV in the garage alleviate some of the issue of cold winters if the vehicle is being continuously driven after leaving the garage versus driving say to a destination and leaving outside in the cold for an extended period? Basically does a warm battery stay warm while being drove during cold winter days?
it helps for sure. But, the impacts are not just battery temperature, it's also the colder air and the use of the heater (in a specific temperature range, a heat pump helps with this, but the Lightning doesn't have one).

The garage can help with cabin temperature, especially if you precondition, as can heated seats.

There's an interesting post at The Truth About Winter EV Range Loss | 13 EVs Compared (recurrentauto.com) that gives some "real world" measurements. There's another interesting post at Can Electric Cars Survive the Cold of Winter? - InsideHook (bingj.com) .
 

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TLDR... as a current Mach E owner, you will come to know your range with time and by pushing it little by little until you get comfortable with the range limitations in the conditions and speeds you drive. Eventually you will learn to charge when needed to meet your needs. I just made a 500 mi round trip and took it below 20% charge twice, once on the way there, once on the way back, charging twice on each leg. You just get the hang of it after a while. It will definitely be more of a chore in the Lightning due to the larger battery pack making charging the same % take significantly longer, which sucks. Just plan your lunch and potty breaks accordingly on longer hauls.
 

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more of a chore in the Lightning due to the larger battery pack making charging the same % take significantly longer
"Significantly longer" No sir.

As per : https://www.ford.com/mustang/ev-charging/mache/
The Mach-e is not a particularly fast charging EV, in fact, it's no faster than our 9 year old Model S according to the Ford documentation I linked above.

Ford Mach-e main site says 10-80% in 45 minutes.
Ford Lightning main site says 15-80% in 41 minutes.

Not bad, not great either way.
 

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2022 F-150 Lightning Lariat with 511A package
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In EV forums there are always lots of new threads popping up from first time BEV drivers who are all worried or worked up because their Guess-O-Meter (GOM) is showing much less range than they think it should. This will especially happen in colder weather when the range drops. For new EV owners, it is important to understand the GOM and what it will and will not do.

Very simple answer: don't rely on the GOM! It doesn't know where you plan to go or the conditions it needs to calculate the actual range it can go. It will always be highly conservative. Be glad Ford gives you a conservative GOM -- it'll help keep you out of trouble.

How far can your Lightning really go? There are two good ways to find out. Neither is the GOM.

1. Trust the navigation system
Get in the car, turn on navigation, and pick a spot 200-300 miles away. See if it will navigate you there without charging. How much range will it have when you get there? If it can't get there without charging try shorter distances.

Once you have found a place near the end of your range the navigation system will tell you the range the car predicts to be able to go when it knows the distance, likely speed, altitude changes, and weather conditions of your drive. The distance of that drive plus the remaining range (you can trust it best when remaining range is low) will tell you your range.

I've found the Ford navigation system to be very accurate and estimating my real range in my Mustang Mach E.

2. How far do you really go?
You can do the same thing with your normal driving. Charge up and drive it for a while. Drive until you are low on charge upon arriving home or a charging destination. How far do you go before charging and how much range does the car think is left? After you have been driving a while (100+ miles), the GOM's estimate will be based on your recent driving and will be a better estimate of remaining battery range than it was when you first hopped in. Even better, the truck will provide you with an energy efficiency for the trip in miles per kilowatt hour (m/kWh). You can use that to estimate your actual range.

Both of these will tell you your car's real range under real-world conditions.

Don't trust the GOM for anything other than a low-ball estimate. Then be glad Ford chose to do it this way. I've hopped in my Leaf trusting the GOM would get me somewhere, only to learn the GOM was based on slow driving around town. If I hop on a freeway, by GOM estimate starts dropping like a rock and my battery won't get me where I need to go at 70 mph on the interstate. I'd rather start out with a conservative GOM than a wildly optimistic one! Ford's GOM is intentionally conservative.

Finally, when winter comes don't be that EV owner to starts asking if their truck is broken or if Ford installed the wrong battery. Your range will go down in cold weather due to a variety of reasons (there are threads here on that). However, your GOM will go down even faster as Ford's conservative algorithms help to keep you from getting stranded.
Well after only 426 miles on my truck I got a nice surprise when I hoped init this morning. My range shows 339 miles.
Grille Automotive lighting Hood Rectangle Bumper
 

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"Significantly longer" No sir.

As per : https://www.ford.com/mustang/ev-charging/mache/
The Mach-e is not a particularly fast charging EV, in fact, it's no faster than our 9 year old Model S according to the Ford documentation I linked above.

Ford Mach-e main site says 10-80% in 45 minutes.
Ford Lightning main site says 15-80% in 41 minutes.

Not bad, not great either way.
Thank you for clarifying misinformation my guy. That is excellent to hear!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
... the Lightning due to the larger battery pack making charging the same % take significantly longer, which sucks. Just plan your lunch and potty breaks accordingly on longer hauls.
On 150kW and higher chargers, Ford says 41 minutes for the ER and 44 minutes for the SR. That's not much longer than the Mach E. Remember though, your navigation system will tell you how much you need to charge. You may not need to charge all the way to 80% during a mid-point charging stop. We often will charge to only 65% depending on the distance to the next charger or the destination.

We have yet to see the charging curve on the Lightning but from what we've heard it will stay at nearly 150 kW through 80-90%. Test drives by Kyle Connor (Out of Spec) and Tom Moloughney (State of Charge) indicate this will be the case.

Bigger batteries can be charged at a higher rate than smaller batteries because the power per cell is much lower.
 
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