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Never had an electric vehicle, currently driving a V8 full size truck. Sort of concerned about the charging while travelling. I read about an ability to use Tesla charging stations (not superchargers), but some adapter is needed. There are all these amps, kwh, volts, etc. Is there a simple graph or information somewhere that says if you drive EV ford (lets says Mach, already on the road), this is what you need to have, to charge on the road, and use Tesla chargers. I see people buying various adapters, that may or may not work, some buying long extension cords to plug into their dryer 240v plug, etc...Ford, and other EV car makers should make things much easier, for non electricians. Thanks! MIke.
 

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Welcome to the forum @mikep! What kind of truck are you driving right now? a F-150? I'll try to help answer your questions as best I can. Hope this helps.

So as far as the Tesla adapter is concerned this is what you'd be looking to get. Like you said it's good on Tesla chargers that are not Superchargers.


The difference between kWh, volts, and amps is that kWh is used to describe how big an EV's battery is and volts and amps are used to describe much electric charge can be delivered to an EV.

Here's a good video that explains charging tips for the Mustang Mach-E that should give you an idea of what you can expect.


 

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Hey mike, I get it it’s hard to get into the nitty gritty of charging unless you know your car’s estimated charge time based on maximum power. Looking over published charge times from ford they say on the f-150 lightning it will charge from 15%-80% in 41 minutes (150KW fast charger) with the extended range battery. And at home a full charge with the 80a (240V) charger will take 8 hours. The problem is, at least for me, 150kw dc fast chargers are not common, only 1 in a 25 mile radius to my house. But they are all over the us and in most mid sized and large cities. There are PLENTY of level 2 chargers out there which will charge your vehicle in 4-16 hours (50kw - 7.2kw), but if you are planning a trip greater than 300 miles without an overnight stay somewhere with a good charger, you want to stop at a dc fast charger like Electrify America with 150kw .
The Tesla level 2 chargers will work on CCS, but not the dc super chargers unfortunately.
I use google maps for searching quickly but there might be some app out there to do the same.
I do not own an electric vehicle yet, but I tried to do my homework.
 

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2021 Mustang Mach E First Edition, 2016 Nissan Leaf, 2003 Toyota Tacoma, F-150 Lightning reserved
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Hey mike, I get it it’s hard to get into the nitty gritty of charging unless you know your car’s estimated charge time based on maximum power. Looking over published charge times from ford they say on the f-150 lightning it will charge from 15%-80% in 41 minutes (150KW fast charger) with the extended range battery. And at home a full charge with the 80a (240V) charger will take 8 hours. The problem is, at least for me, 150kw dc fast chargers are not common, only 1 in a 25 mile radius to my house. But they are all over the us and in most mid sized and large cities. There are PLENTY of level 2 chargers out there which will charge your vehicle in 4-16 hours (50kw - 7.2kw), but if you are planning a trip greater than 300 miles without an overnight stay somewhere with a good charger, you want to stop at a dc fast charger like Electrify America with 150kw .
The Tesla level 2 chargers will work on CCS, but not the dc super chargers unfortunately.
I use google maps for searching quickly but there might be some app out there to do the same.
I do not own an electric vehicle yet, but I tried to do my homework.
The best two apps to start with are PlugShare to see where chargers are located and get information on them, and A Better Route Planner for route planning.
 

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@ChasingCoral how often do you charge away from home per month? What are your driving habits like? work commuter? Do you charge at a regular place like grocery store or work? How often have you used high speed chargers?
These are questions from hopefully a future lightning owner that will probably maybe 5-6 times a year charge away from home for a long distance trip.
 

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2021 Mustang Mach E First Edition, 2016 Nissan Leaf, 2003 Toyota Tacoma, F-150 Lightning reserved
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@ChasingCoral how often do you charge away from home per month? What are your driving habits like? work commuter? Do you charge at a regular place like grocery store or work? How often have you used high speed chargers?
These are questions from hopefully a future lightning owner that will probably maybe 5-6 times a year charge away from home for a long distance trip.
I only DC fast charge when on road trips. In those cases, almost all of the charging is DCFC. Those trips have been MD-FL with 3 weeks to FL, crisscrossing the state, MD-IN, MD-NY. We'll be going up to Bethlehem, PA next week and may have to DCFC on the way home. Sounds about like your frequency. I've had great luck with DCFC. Mind you, I have had to call the charging company, usually Electrify America, a few times to have them reboot the station or have moved to another charger when one of the ones at a station wasn't charging at full speed. However, I've never left a charging station without getting charged in a reasonable time.

The great thing about road tripping with a Ford EV is the built-in navigation. Say you are headed to Naples, FL. You put in the final address and it will tell you all the charging stops you need along the way. If you change your route to charge overnight at a hotel, for example, the next morning it gives you the full new list of charging stops you will need.

Whenever I can, I charge L2. I had a 10 mile commute (one way), now retired. We have lots of local trips still and charge the Leaf a few times a week and probably about twice for the Mach E. I'll often charge opportunistically at grocery stores or such that offer free charging. On road trips I target hotels with L2 chargers to charge overnight. That is easier on the battery and charges you to 100% rather than only 80%.

Here's a good video about charging on the road:
It's about a year old and many things have improved since then but it is still a good intro.
 

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Thanks for sharing your experience! This type of info is hard to come by in the EV world without asking someone who has been there done that already.
You're welcome. Start watching YouTube videos about EVs. That will help. Inside EVs is a good starting place.
 
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