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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Mine worked just fine the first (2) tries. On the third and fourth try it overheated. I know where the round dip switch is, which is at factory default position, #7. I just want the other stuff to work also. Connection to the App, the WiFi and the truck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
The installation manual advices any certified electrician to use 100 amps circuit breaker.
The breaker is not popping. It is the charger that overheats. When it does that and you stand next to it, try touching the cord.
Warm, very warm and really flexible.
Yes.....it charges faster. Even the receptacle is different from other Level 2 receptacles.
You smile watching it charge faster but then you hear the overheat " CLUNK ", and you frown.:confused::confused:
 

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Not noticing the flipping you are referring to. For all intents and purposes, it is running at 80 amps. I didn't get the set up complete, so I don't know what to check. As I'm monitoring the Fordpass app, it is definitely charging much faster. 46% to 64% in 2 hours, saying 100% @ 7pm est. Though I'm expecting my max limit setting to kick in.

My electrician did install an addition piece and I'm forgetting the name of it, outside of the breaker. He said he did some research and noted it needed it. I'm asking him now.
He installed a disconnect next to the FCSP.
 

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Ford's Mobile Power Cord doesn't have any ability to switch power levels except by changing the pigtail: one for 110v and one for 220v.
That is correct, and I understand that the vehicle itself cannot back the power off either?

GM and other makers made this mistake with some of their earlier iterations, assuming that all 110v outlets could handle the full 12amps they were pulling. This false assumption caused fires and melted cords. GM addressed this by having the vehicle default to 8amps, and giving your a warning on the dash to "be sure your outlet is in good condition" when you switch it to 12amps. Tesla put a heat sensor in the cord to back the power off if it gets hot.

Ford appears to have done neither. This bothered me as kind of a "rookie mistake" at first (especially with the melting issues of mobile cords past), but in thinking about it, I really doubt that a lot of people will really use the 110v end anyway. It is a pretty large pack to try to charge @ 1.3kw. ;)
 

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2021 Mustang Mach E First Edition, 2016 Nissan Leaf, 2003 Toyota Tacoma, F-150 Lightning Lariat ER
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That is correct, and I understand that the vehicle itself cannot back the power off either?
Correct. The truck will call for as much power as the charger can deliver, up to the maximum the truck can take.
 

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Just a couple of notes from my experience with the Ford Charge Station Pro.

I did connect successfully to my home Wi-Fi through the FCSP installation app, but it took my iPhone quite a while to connect. It sat thinking for a long time. Maybe one to two minutes?

I have the FCSP connected to a 100 Amp circuit and the dip switch set to the factory position 7. My FordPass app was also left at the default 80 Amps. The first two times I used the charger it had multiple starts and stops before finally completing the charge. The charger's software version from the factory was a lot of numbers, but 64 is the key number.

In the FordPass app I set the charge rate to 64 Amps, and did not touch the dip switch. My next three or four charges were all successful with no interruptions. One note, while charging at 64 Amps there was an amber square that lit up next to the blue pulsating light that indicated it was charging at a reduced rate.

Each day I kept checking for an update to the chargers software version. I had read that the most recent is 68. About five days after installation the charger updated itself to the latest version of 68.

In the FordPass app I bumped up the charging speed to 80 Amps. I have had four successful charges at that speed since the updated software. According to my math it's charging at about 18kW. I'm seeing about 12% charge per hour. For example last night it charged for 31.5 KWH and took 1 hour and 45 minutes to do it.

The cord does get quite warm to the touch while charging, but not so hot that I can't grasp it firmly in my hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Just a couple of notes from my experience with the Ford Charge Station Pro.

I did connect successfully to my home Wi-Fi through the FCSP installation app, but it took my iPhone quite a while to connect. It sat thinking for a long time. Maybe one to two minutes?

I have the FCSP connected to a 100 Amp circuit and the dip switch set to the factory position 7. My FordPass app was also left at the default 80 Amps. The first two times I used the charger it had multiple starts and stops before finally completing the charge. The charger's software version from the factory was a lot of numbers, but 64 is the key number.

In the FordPass app I set the charge rate to 64 Amps, and did not touch the dip switch. My next three or four charges were all successful with no interruptions. One note, while charging at 64 Amps there was an amber square that lit up next to the blue pulsating light that indicated it was charging at a reduced rate.

Each day I kept checking for an update to the chargers software version. I had read that the most recent is 68. About five days after installation the charger updated itself to the latest version of 68.

In the FordPass app I bumped up the charging speed to 80 Amps. I have had four successful charges at that speed since the updated software. According to my math it's charging at about 18kW. I'm seeing about 12% charge per hour. For example last night it charged for 31.5 KWH and took 1 hour and 45 minutes to do it.

The cord does get quite warm to the touch while charging, but not so hot that I can't grasp it firmly in my hand.
Although unsuccessful in connecting with my WiFi, irregardless how long I wait, I still get the warning of " not recognizing the password ".
Ford customer service said that there is a software update. But.....first I need to connect. Just got an email from Siemens. They are working it. They will get back to me soon. I always get those emails at the end of the day, so I am guessing, tomorrow afternoon I will get another one. Once I resolve the connection issue, I am hoping by what you just described to be almost smooth sailing. Will see.
Thanks for the update of the personal trials with this charger. I will report back with mine.
 

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I read from a member that he programed his wallbox to draw 64amps instead of 80amps.
But with mine.....I still can't connect the wallbox to my WiFi. No communication, no control, no programming, no truck recognition, just a dumb charging wallbox on the wall.
I am in that group we find that there is no way that this charger will work at seven. We bumped it down to four and were able to get it to work. After seeing that that was stable we eventually moved it to five which was also stable. I can’t remember if I ever ended up bumping it up to six or not but I’m getting 70% charge in eight hours so I’m thinking it is still at five.

I gave up on ever getting this thing to connect to Wi-Fi so I doubt I will ever be able to get the over the air updates as it simply just does not connect.
 

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I gave up on ever getting this thing to connect to Wi-Fi so I doubt I will ever be able to get the over the air updates as it simply just does not connect.
So last night I was sitting in my living room waiting to watch TNF and I decided to mess with the WiFi again. The unit is on the wall shared with the house in the garage, specifically the living room. This time I got beyond connecting to the boxes WiFi and went to set it up on my home WiFi. I noticed that the signal it was picking up for my WiFi was really low, maybe one bar. I did 2 attempts and it couldn't connect. I need to replace my router, so I'm going to be doing that soon. But what I found funny about this is that I have a wireless speaker in the garage. The speaker is on the opposite wall of the garage from the charging unit. I have no issues with it playing music (wireless meaning WiFi, not BT). So it is making me think the unit doesn't have the best quality WiFi adapter so, boo on @Ford Motor Company for that. Especially with how expensive the unit is.

I haven't looked for it, because the setup and everyone has only talked WiFi, but I can assume there is no hard-line? There should be.
 
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Hard-wired network devices deserve an Ethernet port.
I am wondering if some of the issue is the proximity of the FCSP and the electrical box?
It is natural for people to want to save money on wiring and the FCSP ends up real close to the electrical panel.

From https://help.keenetic.com/hc/en-us/...etworks-The-possible-sources-of-interference-
In addition to the reasons mentioned above, other factors can potentially affect the operation of Wi-Fi networks. For example:

  • Wireless speakers that use 2.4 or 5 GHz bands;
  • Some sources of electrical voltage (such as power lines); do not place the router with a Wi-Fi hotspot near a wall, a cove base, a wiring box, or next to an electrical panel;
  • Cables with insufficient shielding as well as coaxial cables and connectors used with some types of satellite dishes;
  • Some external monitors and LCD screens operating at 2.4 GHz;
  • Wireless cameras and other Wi-Fi devices within the range of your Wi-Fi network.


@Driller - could you comment on the configuration you have? Looking for the location and distances of your router relative to the FCSP and the path and distance from your electric panel to the FCSP. Do they cross or not or run parallel? I have read that running parallel is bad for wi-fi reception. Also curious on the height of the FCSP relative to the router?
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
So.....there are others with connection issues.
Ford commissioned Siemens to built these Wallbox Chargers. Siemens designed and built them to meet Ford's specifications. Ford cannot control the use of internal components and their reliability. All these issues should had been evident/found during the testing process after the final assy. It seems to me none of it was performed. The other odd think I noticed was that Siemens used a third party vendor for assembly in the Philippines.
No test controls from that vendor??
Ford uses a lot of suppliers to deliver components that meet Ford's specifications. I am not faulting Ford for these issues that we experiencing. Siemens has a problem, which now I am waiting to be resolved by the Siemens people. I KNOW that THEY KNOW that there are issues with their chargers.
Now....will find out what they will do to resolve these issues.
In the meantime, the wallbox did work last night. From 23% to 80% in 6 hours. Outside temperature was a 68°. A cold front pushed thru my area lowering the temps by 20 deg.
More on the Siemens issue later.
 

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I am wondering if some of the issue is the proximity of the FCSP and the electrical box?
It is natural for people to want to save money on wiring and the FCSP ends up real close to the electrical panel.

From https://help.keenetic.com/hc/en-us/...etworks-The-possible-sources-of-interference-
In addition to the reasons mentioned above, other factors can potentially affect the operation of Wi-Fi networks. For example:

  • Wireless speakers that use 2.4 or 5 GHz bands;
  • Some sources of electrical voltage (such as power lines); do not place the router with a Wi-Fi hotspot near a wall, a cove base, a wiring box, or next to an electrical panel;
  • Cables with insufficient shielding as well as coaxial cables and connectors used with some types of satellite dishes;
  • Some external monitors and LCD screens operating at 2.4 GHz;
  • Wireless cameras and other Wi-Fi devices within the range of your Wi-Fi network.


@Driller - could you comment on the configuration you have? Looking for the location and distances of your router relative to the FCSP and the path and distance from your electric panel to the FCSP. Do they cross or not or run parallel? I have read that running parallel is bad for wi-fi reception. Also curious on the height of the FCSP relative to the router?
My internet is fiber and comes in through my basement on the north side (middle) of my house. I have a Google Nest mesh network with the hub (router) in my basement near where the cable comes in. I have two other wifi points upstairs on the east and west ends of the house.

My electrical panel is upstairs and also on the north side of my house almost directly above the router in the basement. The electrician routed the cable from my electrical box up into my attic and diagonally across to my garage that is on the southwest side of my house. He installed a sub-panel there with a 100 Amp and a 50 Amp circuit at my request. The bottom of the panel is about 48 inches from the garage floor.

I have a NEMA 14-50 outlet installed about 6 inches below the panel and my FCSP is installed right next to the panel, about a foot away, at the same height. My internet and power cables do not cross with each other.

Sorry, without a picture for you that's the best that I can describe.
 

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I am wondering if some of the issue is the proximity of the FCSP and the electrical box?
It is natural for people to want to save money on wiring and the FCSP ends up real close to the electrical panel.

From https://help.keenetic.com/hc/en-us/...etworks-The-possible-sources-of-interference-
In addition to the reasons mentioned above, other factors can potentially affect the operation of Wi-Fi networks. For example:

  • Wireless speakers that use 2.4 or 5 GHz bands;
  • Some sources of electrical voltage (such as power lines); do not place the router with a Wi-Fi hotspot near a wall, a cove base, a wiring box, or next to an electrical panel;
  • Cables with insufficient shielding as well as coaxial cables and connectors used with some types of satellite dishes;
  • Some external monitors and LCD screens operating at 2.4 GHz;
  • Wireless cameras and other Wi-Fi devices within the range of your Wi-Fi network.
You've just described why I hate that manufacturers in multiple areas going all wireless. I almost daily now deal with the issues of getting Android Auto to just pull up in my truck and that's cause it defaults wireless first. I general plug it in but even then it will still not connect.

To the point of the electrical panel for my setup, my electricial panel is on the opposite end of the house so I had to pay near 1k for the 100 amp line to run the length of my house for the charging station.
 
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You've just described why I hate that manufacturers in multiple areas going all wireless. I almost daily now deal with the issues of getting Android Auto to just pull up in my truck and that's cause it defaults wireless first. I general plug it in but even then it will still not connect.

To the point of the electrical panel for my setup, my electricial panel is on the opposite end of the house so I had to pay near 1k for the 100 amp line to run the length of my house for the charging station.
I'm 100% with you. A few years ago, I opened up all my phone jacks and found they all had cat 5 cable, but yet no ethernet drops had been installed. So, after a little studying, I upgraded all of them to ethernet drops and made a nice switch panel. Why? Well, I was an early streaming adopter, and could never understand why anyone would stream over wifi when a hardwired connection was possible, simply due to reliability.....

Sound familiar?
 

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I'm 100% with you. A few years ago, I opened up all my phone jacks and found they all had cat 5 cable, but yet no ethernet drops had been installed. So, after a little studying, I upgraded all of them to ethernet drops and made a nice switch panel. Why? Well, I was an early streaming adopter, and could never understand why anyone would stream over wifi when a hardwired connection was possible, simply due to reliability.....

Sound familiar?
It is why, with telework, my work computer is not wireless. I'm not dealing with any range issue. I know I need to do a bit more in the house because of all the stuff that is connected but it becomes such a hassle. And while my family has complained, I know at the same time I'm in the basement - one screen watching youtube or netflix, another screen playing a video game and then my laptop, also plugged in, is downloading gigs of crap: NO ISSUES.

I have found with my truck, if I try to plug in my iPhone before it connects wirelessly to Sync it will often times fail to connect.
I haven't fully decided whether to blame this on Ford or Android. But I've had issues with this going back to my 2017 mustang. It is only wired Android Auto and that would sometimes not pick up. I think the primary issue there is if I had the USB in the car first before I plugged it into my phone. Often times it would not resolve unless I turned the car off and back on (thank you IT crowd). In the Mach E, I never really did wired. It would not pick up the wirless occasionally but eventually would fix itself. It seems in the truck, as I said before, daily. If I'm going to work, I always plug in but it is after I start the truck. If I'm running around town I just leave the phone in my pocket. I've also done the reset infotainment thing and it'll still fail afterwards but eventually it does connect. But the issue is mainly that it'll take some time before it acts right and I'm a stickler for time and I'm not going to sit there getting it to work before I leave.
 

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We have two panels on our house- a main and a sub. Our house is orientated in a N to S position along the road in front (which also runs in a N to S direction). The main panel is located in the basement on a northernmost wall where the main service enters the house on the floor above. The router is in an office whose northern wall is almost literally where power and internet service enter the house. It's eastern wall is shared with the living room. That border is where the power and cable enter the house. The sub panel is on a southern wall (but not southernmost) wall in the basement.

The 100A breaker to feed the CSP feeds off the main (I believe, but could be the sub- don't remember ATM) and is located on the northern wall of the garage. We had NEMA 1450 and 1430 ports added directly below when they added the breaker. The CSP sits on the eastern wall (ie facing you as you pull into the garage).

Not sure if that's helpful, but I'm also not sure if there's any interference occurring. Above the CSP on the same wall I have a wifi connected Ring camera and the control box for our smart garage door opener is there. Both have worked without fail and continue to work without fail post install of the CSP. So, I agree, it gets me to thinking it's not our home wifi signals that are the problem- I think the CSP itself has a weak radio or antennae or both.

It works, but only ramped down to 5 (I double checked we never bumped it back up to 6 because that was where it started faulting again) and not in any 'smart' capacity.

ETA: we do not leave the breaker switch that feeds either NEMA plug or the CSP in the on position. We flip the breaker switch that feeds the CSP when I need to charge, and turn it off after- not that that should matter with being able to connect it to the app when it's on but thought I would mention it.
 
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