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I would say possible under favorable conditions
 

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Yeah, downhill with a tail wind and while drafting a semi-truck.

No chance in heck the F-150 will get 400 miles of range in any type of NORMAL driving conditions.
I'm holding off because of the world record the Mach E holds (I believe it still holds). I hope the same people do that test with the Lightning. 6.5 miles per kWh on a 88kw battery.
 

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I'm holding off because of the world record the Mach E holds (I believe it still holds). I hope the same people do that test with the Lightning. 6.5 miles per kWh on a 88kw battery.
maybe, if you over inflate the tires, drive on a constant 45mph on a warmish day...!
The Kona Electric holds the record for longest kms driven on a single charge, in this case 637 miles on a 64kwh battery - Hyundai KONA Electric sets range record of 1,026 kilometers | Automotive World
 

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I'm holding off because of the world record the Mach E holds (I believe it still holds). I hope the same people do that test with the Lightning. 6.5 miles per kWh on a 88kw battery.
There are "perfect scenarios" where you can get amazing range figures. But, 99% of people level in the real world and are concerned with what you can get from the EV in REAL WORLD, every day driving conditions. So, just because you can find one particular stretch of road that will allow you to get astronomical range figures, doesn't mean that's the vehicle's actual range. Need to always do ROUND TRIP. Start, drive somewhere and drive back to the same point. Thus, if you go down a long hill and get 6.8 miles per wh, you then have to drive back up that same long hill to get home, where you'll get just 1.5 miles per wh.

I've owned Tesla EV's for years now. A Tesla is far more efficient than a 7,000 brick (truck) driving through the air. I don't drive 45 MPH on the freeway. I drive normal. Tesla's, if you drive them nicely, can average up to 4 miles per wh. But, that's in perfect weather, not speeding. The more realistic average is about 2.75 miles per wh in REAL WORLD driving. The truck, in real world, normal driving will likely be around 2 miles per wh. 131 kWh battery. And you end up around 262 miles of range. If you have a perfect weather day, drive very carefully at a constant speed of 55-60 mph, which means you're a moving road block in the freeway, you might get 3 miles per wh. More realistically, will be around 2.5 miles per wh.

If you're in a cold weather environment where temps are below 30 degrees and you want to use the heater, like most people do in gas cars. Your range will likely be in the 1.5 mile per wh range, around 200 miles of total range.

Just trying to give you real world figures. Too many people expect too much from their EV's and are disappointed. Just because Tesla says their car "can" do 400 miles per charge doesn't mean that most people will ever get that kind of range. In fact, almost none of them will if they drive "normally". EV's are great and I could never go back to an ICE vehicle. But, I'm realistic at what they're capable of and what limitations they do have. I accept them and am willing to make a few sacrifices for all the benefits you get from driving / owning an EV. Because of my reality check, I'm able to truly appreciate all that EV life has to offer. There are many that expect that, just because the rating says 300 miles, it will get 300 miles all the time and are made when it doesn't. No different than a vehicle that's rated to get 20 miles per gallon of gas. However, if you "floor it" all the time, drive up hills, tow something, use the AC or Heat, naturally, that vehicle will not get 20 mpg. EV's are no different. The only difference is in long distance travel. You don't have a charger on every corner like we do gas stations. Not yet at least. And, it takes notably longer to charge than to fill up a gas tank.

If you drive 500 miles a day on a regular basis, EV's are still not the best option. If you drive less than 100 miles a day like most, you get really spoiled with NEVER having to stop at a gas station again. You get spoiled with instant torque off the line. And always having a full "tank" (battery) each morning you leave your house. For those that travel over 300 miles only a few times a year, the sacrifice of longer charging is an easy sacrifice to make for the other 355 days a year I make no sacrifices.
 

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There are "perfect scenarios" where you can get amazing range figures. But, 99% of people level in the real world and are concerned with what you can get from the EV in REAL WORLD, every day driving conditions. So, just because you can find one particular stretch of road that will allow you to get astronomical range figures, doesn't mean that's the vehicle's actual range. Need to always do ROUND TRIP. Start, drive somewhere and drive back to the same point. Thus, if you go down a long hill and get 6.8 miles per wh, you then have to drive back up that same long hill to get home, where you'll get just 1.5 miles per wh.

I've owned Tesla EV's for years now. A Tesla is far more efficient than a 7,000 brick (truck) driving through the air. I don't drive 45 MPH on the freeway. I drive normal. Tesla's, if you drive them nicely, can average up to 4 miles per wh. But, that's in perfect weather, not speeding. The more realistic average is about 2.75 miles per wh in REAL WORLD driving. The truck, in real world, normal driving will likely be around 2 miles per wh. 131 kWh battery. And you end up around 262 miles of range. If you have a perfect weather day, drive very carefully at a constant speed of 55-60 mph, which means you're a moving road block in the freeway, you might get 3 miles per wh. More realistically, will be around 2.5 miles per wh.

If you're in a cold weather environment where temps are below 30 degrees and you want to use the heater, like most people do in gas cars. Your range will likely be in the 1.5 mile per wh range, around 200 miles of total range.

Just trying to give you real world figures. Too many people expect too much from their EV's and are disappointed. Just because Tesla says their car "can" do 400 miles per charge doesn't mean that most people will ever get that kind of range. In fact, almost none of them will if they drive "normally". EV's are great and I could never go back to an ICE vehicle. But, I'm realistic at what they're capable of and what limitations they do have. I accept them and am willing to make a few sacrifices for all the benefits you get from driving / owning an EV. Because of my reality check, I'm able to truly appreciate all that EV life has to offer. There are many that expect that, just because the rating says 300 miles, it will get 300 miles all the time and are made when it doesn't. No different than a vehicle that's rated to get 20 miles per gallon of gas. However, if you "floor it" all the time, drive up hills, tow something, use the AC or Heat, naturally, that vehicle will not get 20 mpg. EV's are no different. The only difference is in long distance travel. You don't have a charger on every corner like we do gas stations. Not yet at least. And, it takes notably longer to charge than to fill up a gas tank.

If you drive 500 miles a day on a regular basis, EV's are still not the best option. If you drive less than 100 miles a day like most, you get really spoiled with NEVER having to stop at a gas station again. You get spoiled with instant torque off the line. And always having a full "tank" (battery) each morning you leave your house. For those that travel over 300 miles only a few times a year, the sacrifice of longer charging is an easy sacrifice to make for the other 355 days a year I make no sacrifices.
Exactly how I'm viewing this. BTW, heat in a ICE does not measurably affect mileage which is a key difference....figured you just typed too fast. I plan on driving normally, and live in a cold climate. Yep, I'll have to charge, but damn it, I've driving 80 mph on the freeway which is our speed limit.
 

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Exactly how I'm viewing this. BTW, heat in a ICE does not measurably affect mileage which is a key difference....figured you just typed too fast. I plan on driving normally, and live in a cold climate. Yep, I'll have to charge, but damn it, I've driving 80 mph on the freeway which is our speed limit.
You're right, not so much the heat. The AC will have an impact. Heat has a BIG impact on EV's though. You get the overall point. Just hate to see anyone be disappointed from over expectations. If you keep your expectations realistic, then EV ownership is incredible. Generally, the ones that take the literature too literally are the one's disappointed and abandon ship too soon.
 

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You're right, not so much the heat. The AC will have an impact. Heat has a BIG impact on EV's though. You get the overall point. Just hate to see anyone be disappointed from over expectations. If you keep your expectations realistic, then EV ownership is incredible. Generally, the ones that take the literature too literally are the one's disappointed and abandon ship too soon.
I'll just take all of it as you misinterpret what I mean. You haven't dissuaded me from my thoughts that I shared at all. You haven't told me anything I don't already know. I have an EV now.

Sorry you got all worked up about it. Which is nothing but words on the internet.
 

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Being an EV owner and familiar with the attributes, there is no way an extended range aka 131 kw battery is propelling the Lightning with its weight and profile over 300 miles.

I bought mine knowing this full well and close to 300 in mixed driving is plenty. The reality will be probably 275 in summer and 225 in the cold. Road trips, where aero, wind and elevation changes are most meaningful will probably be in the 230 range in warmer temps at 70 mph.

The reality is this is plenty as we are mostly older guys and need a pee break sooner than the miles. I am a little concerned on the 400v architecture as the charging curve will need to be really good, or reality will be a 1 hour 10-80% with this size battery.

Currently we have an Ioniq 5 which is 800v and even that can take double its 18 min claimed 10-80% in cold temps. I'm speaking from EV experience and charging knowledge (I've actually done 4 private 240v EVSE installs - wiring and the units in the last year). SIDE NOTE: If you only have capacity for a 40 amp circuit (which means a 32 amp Level 2 charge) you will be fine for home charging.

Not trying to be a Debbie Downer but if you charge at home, none of this matters except for road trips...and even then, it is not a huge 'real world' difference in time vs an ICE vehicle.
 

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2021 Mustang Mach E First Edition, 2016 Nissan Leaf, 2003 Toyota Tacoma, F-150 Lightning reserved
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In one of the recent videos the estimated range was 273. I think that’s probably realistic. I hope it’s closer the 300.
If you are thinking about the video I think you are, you were looking at the Guess-o-Meter of a preproduction vehicle that is driven very strangely. While it was useful to compare the GOM's estimate with and without trailer as a ratio, don't trust either to represent reality. That video will show what Ford currently thinks will be the impact of a given trailer on range. That is the single most accurate point you can gain. The 273 as an absolute is going to be a conservative estimate on range knowing NOTHING about the key factors of how fast you will drive, your driving style, the weather, or the potential change in elevation on that drive.
 

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I never trust the GOM.
The range will depend a lot on efficiency etc. My wife’s EQS 450 would easily achieve the EPA estimate of 350 and it’s a big heavy car. Granted it has a lot less drag than the Lightning will.
I am really hoping for 300 miles of range. In my opinion, that’s the sweet spot for EV‘s.
 

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Not trying to be a Debbie Downer but if you charge at home, none of this matters except for road trips...and even then, it is not a huge 'real world' difference in time vs an ICE vehicle.
This is one of the things I've slowly adjusted too and I think is one of the actual things people need to adopt when considering EV. The range anxiety is a bit overstated. The real concern is charge time on a road trip. I've been surprised at how well the charge holds during my drive which is totally controllable by me, cause I'm the one driving. Last Friday I took the Mach E to work in 30 degree weather (5:30 am) and didn't precondition. I left with less than ideal charge %. (I want to say around 60% on the SR, maybe 70). The miles states when I got to work were still more than I need by like 10 miles, maybe 20 to get home. (and because it is GOM, I was a bit antsy about it) So I thought I'd just stop at a DC charger (like I've done before) but then I didn't cause I wanted to get back and I felt like Kramer.

So instead I changed how I went back and I think I was at 40% when I left work. (I even put in the navigation, Ford's, home to see what it thought I should do but I didn't take it cause it wanted me to stop at a charger) I took the slowest way back, average speed of 40. By the time I got to my exit, I stopped being worried. I had plenty of charge left to get home. Now I never used the heat and it was still 30s and overcast when I left work around 11; little rainy too. And to that last point, a previous gas powered car I had was a 4 banger and mornings in which I left for work, that engine was so terrible at heating up that I wouldn't actually feel hot air until I to go work about 30 minutes later. So I'm use to just having the heated steering wheel. (Though thinking about it now I could have used the heat for parts of the trip based on the % I had left).

I'll be thrilled if I get 2.0-2.2 miles/Kwh driving around suburbia in my Lightning during summer...
I don't remember if I posted in this thread but that is what the Rivian in my area is getting, 2.5 mi/kWh in 30-40 degree weather and he just drives around suburbia (he works for Rivian from home). R1T is heavier than the Lightning but probably more aerodynamic, though I don't know if the drag co-efficients are posted anywhere (ok so R1t has .3 - 2022 Rivian R1T (Launch Edition (135 kWh)) Specs not sure how accurate that is. I think the F150 is above .5)
 

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This is one of the things I've slowly adjusted too and I think is one of the actual things people need to adopt when considering EV. The range anxiety is a bit overstated. The real concern is charge time on a road trip. I've been surprised at how well the charge holds during my drive which is totally controllable by me, cause I'm the one driving. Last Friday I took the Mach E to work in 30 degree weather (5:30 am) and didn't precondition. I left with less than ideal charge %. (I want to say around 60% on the SR, maybe 70). The miles states when I got to work were still more than I need by like 10 miles, maybe 20 to get home. (and because it is GOM, I was a bit antsy about it) So I thought I'd just stop at a DC charger (like I've done before) but then I didn't cause I wanted to get back and I felt like Kramer.

So instead I changed how I went back and I think I was at 40% when I left work. (I even put in the navigation, Ford's, home to see what it thought I should do but I didn't take it cause it wanted me to stop at a charger) I took the slowest way back, average speed of 40. By the time I got to my exit, I stopped being worried. I had plenty of charge left to get home. Now I never used the heat and it was still 30s and overcast when I left work around 11; little rainy too. And to that last point, a previous gas powered car I had was a 4 banger and mornings in which I left for work, that engine was so terrible at heating up that I wouldn't actually feel hot air until I to go work about 30 minutes later. So I'm use to just having the heated steering wheel. (Though thinking about it now I could have used the heat for parts of the trip based on the % I had left).


I don't remember if I posted in this thread but that is what the Rivian in my area is getting, 2.5 mi/kWh in 30-40 degree weather and he just drives around suburbia (he works for Rivian from home). R1T is heavier than the Lightning but probably more aerodynamic, though I don't know if the drag co-efficients are posted anywhere (ok so R1t has .3 - 2022 Rivian R1T (Launch Edition (135 kWh)) Specs not sure how accurate that is. I think the F150 is above .5)
That's impressive if accurate on the Rivian. When we drove our previous RAV4 Prime in full EV we'd get 2.5 mi/Kwh (during winter) and about 3.2 in summer. We traded for an Ioniq 5 and ironically get 2.5 during winter.

Considering both of the above are approx 4,500 lbs, 2.5 in a 7,000 lb Rivian is great.
 

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.5 drag coefficient? Oof. Looks like I am back to driving slow to maximize range like when I got my Leaf in 2011. Those were heady days. 60 miles of range and barely any infrastructure.
 
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